syndicalism

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syndicalism

(sĭn`dĭkəlĭzəm), political and economic doctrine that advocates control of the means and processes of production by organized bodies of workers. Like anarchists, syndicalists believe that any form of state is an instrument of oppression and that the state should be abolished. Viewing the trade union as the essential unit of production, they believe that it should be the basic organizational unit of society. To achieve their aims, syndicalists advocate direct industrial action, e.g., the general strikegeneral strike,
sympathetic cessation of work by a majority of the workers in all industries of a locality or nation. Such a stoppage is economic if it is for the purpose of redressing some grievance or pressing upon the employer a series of economic demands.
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, sabotagesabotage
[Fr., sabot=wooden shoe; hence, to work clumsily], form of direct action by workers against employers through obstruction of work and/or lowering of plant efficiency. Methods range from peaceful slowing of production to destruction of property.
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, slowdowns, and other means of disrupting the existing system of production. They eschew political action as both corruptive and self-defeating. The writings of Pierre Joseph ProudhonProudhon, Pierre Joseph
, 1809–65, French social theorist. Of a poor family, Proudhon won an education through scholarships. Much of his later life was spent in poverty. He achieved prominence through his pamphlet What Is Property? (1840, tr.
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, with his attacks on property, and of Georges SorelSorel, Georges
, 1847–1922, French social philosopher. An engineer before he devoted himself to writing, Sorel found in the political and social life of bourgeois democracy the triumph of mediocrity and espoused various forms of socialism, chiefly revolutionary syndicalism.
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, who espoused violence, have influenced syndicalist doctrine. Syndicalism, like anarchismanarchism
[Gr.,=having no government], theory that equality and justice are to be sought through the abolition of the state and the substitution of free agreements between individuals.
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, has flourished largely in Latin countries, especially in France, where trade unionism was for years strongly influenced by syndicalist programs. Syndicalism began a steady decline after World War I as a result of competition from Communist unions, government suppression, and internal splits between the revolutionary anarcho-syndicalists and moderate reformers. In the United States the chief organization of the syndicalist type was the Industrial Workers of the WorldIndustrial Workers of the World
(IWW), revolutionary industrial union organized in Chicago in 1905 by delegates from the Western Federation of Mines, which formed the nucleus of the IWW, and 42 other labor organizations.
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, which flourished early in the 20th cent. but was virtually extinguished after World War I.

Bibliography

See F. F. Ridley, Revolutionary Syndicalism in France (1970).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

syndicalism

see ANARCHO-SYNDICALISM.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

syndicalism

1. a revolutionary movement and theory advocating the seizure of the means of production and distribution by syndicates of workers through direct action, esp a general strike
2. an economic system resulting from such action
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Within less than a decade after the appearance of syndicalism in France, the thought of Italian syndicalists wielded influence over some of Italy's most radical Marxists--and, as such, syndicalism was to establish itself as a force in the shaping of events.
Even the pessimistic Robert Michels stressed that organized anarchists and syndicalists paid unparalleled attention to establishing structures that were as bottom-up and democratic as possible.
After the event, the Futurists, Anarchists and Syndicalists marched, to the strain of the International, towards Corso San Celso, where the police tried to dissolve their gathering.
Green syndicalists insist that overcoming ecological devastation depends on shared responsibilities towards developing convivial ways of living in which relations of affinity, both within our own species and with other species, are nurtured (See Bari, 2001).
Even though a few months later Rousset was convicted of murdering another soldier, a massive demonstration on February 11, 1912 that brought 20,000 to Pere-Lachaise Cemetery demonstrated that socialists, syndicalists, and anarchists could work together effectively.
The paper explores how this alliance was attempted and discusses the political ecology of the activists' "green syndicalist" vision.
Hagerty, a Catholic priest who had been ordained in the Archdiocese of Chicago in 1895, was a key figure ten years later in the debates from which the convention's syndicalist (and partially anarchist) manifesto was created.
By studying two groups of workers who joined the IWW and subsequently reaffiliated with the AFL, he emphasizes the similarities; seemingly, the "conservative" AFL was open enough to accommodate the militant IWW syndicalists. Yet, Kimeldorf needs to better explain how and why the AFL could be both conservative (exclusive in its membership) and radical (flexible enough to allow white ethnics and blacks to join).
Berghaus depicts at considerable length parallels and linkages between Left figures such as Gramsci, other varieties of communists and syndicalists, and the "dynamic" ideas and spirit of Futurism.
Syndicalists blame labor-saving technology and foreign competition.
In rallying workers first under "union" rather than "class" banners, British syndicalists sought enfranchisement not through the vote or the party, but through the workers' own sources of power: industrial sabotage, "ca-canny," the slow-down, the strike.
The party was transformed into a quasi totalitarian machine in order to mute the regime's opponents (mainly leftists and syndicalists) and to control more closely, under the infamous Article 120 of the FLN Statutes, the mass organizations.

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