Syneresis


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syneresis

[sə′ner·ə·səs]
(chemistry)
Spontaneous separation of a liquid from a gel or colloidal suspension due to contraction of the gel.

Syneresis

 

a spontaneous contraction of a jelly or gel accompanied by exudation of the liquid. Syneresis occurs as a result of a closer packing of the three-dimensional structural network, which in jellies is formed by macromolecules and in gels by particles of the disperse phase. During syneresis, the structured system is converted into a thermodynamically more stable state. Syneresis is one manifestation of aging or “ripening” in different types of disperse structures, as well as in polymer and biological systems. It has considerable practical significance in the preparation of food products (cheese, cottage cheese), in rubber technology (preparation of latex products), and in the formation of chemical fibers from spinning solutions.

References in periodicals archive ?
(2007) concluded that sheep milk yoghurt with elevated fat content obtained greater texture scores such as firmness and lower syneresis index than other low- regular-fat treatments.
On the other hand, Ramirez-Sucre & Velez-Ruiz (33) presented results of syneresis with the same tendency as those reported in the present study, an increase of the fat from 0.2 to 3.2% w/v decreased the syneresis by about 32%.
On dilated fundus examination, there was vitreous syneresis, peripheral pigmentary changes, and a weak foveal reflex in both eyes (Figure 5).
The effect produced by imbibition and syneresis on the dimensions of the impression and on the overall detail reproduction on the cast has been studied with varying results.
Effect of konjac glucomannan on syneresis, textural properties and the microstructure of frozen rice starch gels.
The extent of syneresis in all the treatments was not different from control (P>0.05).
Today's typical yogurt formulations include milk, cultures, sweeteners and/or flavors and gelatin, which contributes several key attributes in yogurt: smooth mouth-feel, shiny appearance, stability and avoidance of syneresis. However, for all of gelatin's benefits, yogurt manufacturers are increasingly looking to either partially or completely replace gelatin in their formulations.
The effect of partial replacement of skim milk powder with whey protein concentrate on the viscosity and syneresis of yoghurt.
Hydrocolloids gums are added through the processing for two main reasons as thickening or gelling agents and to stabilize the yogurt matrix (Early, 1998; Phillips & Williams 2000; Tamime & Robinson, 1999) that can improve the viscosity, maintain the yogurt structure, inhibit syneresis (FDA, 1996) and alter the mouthfeel (Early, 1998).
Evolution of water proton nuclear magnetic relaxation during milk coagulation and syneresis: structural implications.