Synodikon

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Synodikon

 

in Russia from the second half of the 17th century to the 18th century, a literary work containing Byzantine and Russian tales and selections from The Golden Mirror.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the center of the meaning of the celebration of the Sunday of Orthodoxy, as it is concisely expressed in the historic Synodikon of 843 (an event which is a true participatory icon project).
639 C.E.), elected patriarch of Jerusalem in 634 C.E., distributed a celebrated synodikon to his fellow bishops upon his installation as patriarch.
At first glance, the bishop-elect's contemporary liturgical recitation of the confessions of faith, like the synodikon, would seem to confirm his orthodoxy and ability to fulfill his duty of maintaining communion through correct teaching in the gospel.
3, at "Synodikon." "Synodikon" also refers to conciliar doctrinal teaching, illustrated best by the Synodikon of Orthodoxy still proclaimed on the first Sunday of Lent in the churches of the Byzantine rite.
V: la toma del Synodikon, una obra perdida de Atanasio.
The unique Synodikon of Orthodoxy of 843 casts its shadow over the rhyme and reason of this collection, as the Synodikon is a recapitulation of Byzantium's long struggle with orthodoxy, both before and after its first declamation.