Synusia

synusia

[sə′nü·zhə]
(ecology)
A structural unit of a community characterized by uniformity of life-form or of height.

Synusia

 

a spatially and ecologically isolated part of a plant community consisting of species of plants of one or more ecologically close life-forms. For example, in forests of the temperate zone there are dozens of synusiae, including those that are layered (trees, shrublets), epiphytic (lichens, mosses, and algae on trunks), epigenous (parasitic fungi on leaves), epixylous (fungi on dead wood), and intrasoil (microorganisms). The concept of synusiae was proposed in 1918 by the German geobotanist G. Gams. He, as well as the Swedish botanist G. E. Du Rietz and the Estonian botanist T. Lippmaa, elaborated the method of synusiae, which uses the synusia as the initial object in the study of vegetation.

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As a result there were studied the CPU of 11 species of the wood synusia [32].
The terms synusia, union and federation for community, association and alliance are still occasionally applied (PAUS, 1997), however always with the agreement that such assemblages should be described according to the rules of the ICPN (WEBER & al., 2000).
By 2012, the SP-1 environmental space increased, because most part of the swamp dried up and the subpopulation moved to a green moss, sphagnum synusia; the number was increased to 91 individuals.
Gaiser, edd., Synusia: Festgabe fur Wolfgang Schadewaldt, 1965, 29-52.
The role ofParanectria oropensis in community dynamics of epiphyte synusia on roadside trees.
Junipers are more widely distributed both geographically and elevationally and extend into drier and colder habitats than pinons, but in the true woodland usually one juniper species and one pinon species comprise the tree synusia. The woodland extends from the east slope of the Sierra Nevada eastward throughout the mountains of the Great Basin in Nevada, Utah, and southern Idaho, and the foothills of Wyoming, onto the flanks of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado (as well as mesas of the Colorado Plateau and interior valleys), then southward into Arizona, New Mexico, western Texas, and northern Mexico (West et al., 1975; West, 1988).
Forest strata have been studied as separate ecological entities (e.g., synusia, union) since early in this century (Shimwell 1971: 57-58).
Ecology of a heath-shrub synusia in the pine barrens of Long Island, New York.
The two groups show a set of species in common such as Geranium nodosum, Dryopteris filix-mas, Polystichum aculeatum, Geranium robertianum and Saxifraga rotundifolia, which are typical of the herbal synusia of the humid beech woods of the area, in sites with rocks and often near streams.