insecticide

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insecticide

[in′sek·tə‚sīd]
(materials)
A chemical agent that destroys insects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transgenic cotton, Sucking insect pests, Systemic insecticides, Beneficial insects, In-situ efficacy.
Imidacloprid and emamectin benzoate are 2 systemic insecticides known to have some effect against gall-forming insects (Doccola et al.
Imidacloprid {1-(6 chloronicotinyl)-2-(nitroimino) imidazolidine} is a systemic insecticide with soil, seed, and foliar uses for the control of sucking pests (Sanyal et al.
That combination makes them work as systemic insecticides, but also means that the chemicals are active against pests and pollinators for an extended period of time.
Healthy landscape ash trees, for example, can be treated with a systemic insecticide, while urban ash in poor condition can be removed, reducing the amount of ash phloem available-for EAB reproduction.
Then spray with a systemic insecticide to get rid of any sap-sucking pests.
This suggested to the beekeepers that foraging bees, instead of dying immediately (as experienced in bee kills resulting from exposure to more traditional pesticides), were bringing back pollen and nectar contaminated with low levels of the systemic insecticide to the colony.
Monocil is a systemic insecticide, which controls broad spectrum of pests in a wide range of crops and was one of the largest selling molecules.
Once you have sprayed the plant with a strong force of water, it would be wise to use a systemic insecticide that can control these pests.
have reached new toll manufacturing arrangements for a number of Sumitomo Chemical's products in Australia, including Admiral Insect Growth Regulator, Shield Systemic Insecticide, and Sumi-Alpha Flex.
He said he had just learned two weeks ago that maples in Worcester would be injected with the systemic insecticide imidacloprid to vaccinate the tree against Asian longhorned beetle larvae and while USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service said there's "reason for concern" among beekeepers, the degree of concern has not yet been determined.
Sticky foliage is a sure sign of aphids, which are easily dealt with using a systemic insecticide applied every 3-6 months.

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