T cell

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Related to T-cells: Cytokines, B-cells

T cell

[′tē ‚sel]
(immunology)
One of a heterogeneous population of thymus-derived lymphocytes which participates in the immune responses. Also known as T lymphocyte.
References in periodicals archive ?
During type 1 diabetes, killer T-cells are thought to attack pancreatic beta cells.
T-cells are a living drug, and they have the potential to persist in our body for our whole lives.
Secondly, it shows how T-cells might cause unwanted damage to healthy tissue in other diseases such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.
For HIV, lack of memory T-cells prevents the so-called "hiding place" or reservoir to avoid interaction with antiretroviral drugs.
We already had good evidence, from mouse studies, that other tissues have their own types of T-cells and that they play an important role in mediating immune protection," Dr.
Our findings show how killer T-cells might play an important role in auto-immune diseases like diabetes and we've secured the first ever glimpse of the mechanism by which killer T-cells can attack our own body cells to cause disease.
Under normal conditions, the mice's T-cells produced an inflammatory response and triggered the creation of cellular proteins interferon (INF)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha.
Researchers found treatment with tumour necrosis factor (TNF), an immune system regulating protein, leads to the death of wayward T-cells while leaving the immune system unharmed.
The activated antibody binds to T-cells, the body's own defence system, triggering the T-cells to target the surrounding tissue.
AdapT technology uses proprietary two-peptide molecular constructs to selectively cause the death of only those immune T-cells that are involved in autoimmune disease, asthma, allergy, and transplant rejection, by having these disease causing T-cells undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death) and anergy (a state of immune unresponsiveness).