Transmission Control Protocol

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Transmission Control Protocol

[tranz‚mish·ən kən′trōl ‚prōd·ə‚kȯl]
(communications)
The set of standards that is responsible for breaking down and reassembling the data packets transmitted on the Internet, for ensuring complete delivery of the packets, and for controlling data flow. Abbreviated TCP.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Transmission Control Protocol

(networking, protocol)
(TCP) The most common transport layer protocol used on Ethernet and the Internet. It was developed by DARPA.

TCP is the connection-oriented protocol built on top of Internet Protocol (IP) and is nearly always seen in the combination TCP/IP (TCP over IP). It adds reliable communication and flow-control and provides full-duplex, process-to-process connections.

TCP is defined in STD 7 and RFC 793.

User Datagram Protocol is the other, connectionless, protocol that runs on top of IP.
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TCP

(1) (Tape Carrier Package) See tape automated bonding.

(2) (Transmission Control Protocol) The reliable transport protocol within the TCP/IP protocol suite. TCP ensures that all data arrive accurately and 100% intact at the other end. TCP is "connection oriented" and requires a handshake before the session can begin. See UDP and TCP/IP.


The Transport Layer of TCP/IP
The transport layer of the TCP/IP protocol defines both reliable (TCP) and unreliable (UDP) delivery methods. TCP is used for data, while UDP is used for streaming media, voice over IP (VoIP) and videoconferencing.
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