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Tom

(tôm), river, c.525 mi (840 km) long, rising in the Alatau range, S Siberian Russia. It flows N through the Kuznetsk Basin past Novokuznetsk, Kemerovo, and Tomsk into the Ob River. It is navigable from Novokuznetsk.

Tom’

 

(in its upper course, Tomskaia Rossoshina), a river in Amur Oblast, RSFSR; a left tributary of the Zeia River (Amur River basin). The Tom’ is 433 km long and drains an area of 16,000 sq km. It rises in the Turana Range and flows through the Zeia-Bureia Lowland. It is fed primarily by rain. High water lasts from May through October. The mean flow rate near the mouth is 103 cu m per sec. The Tom’ freezes in late October or early November, and the ice breaks up in late April or early May. The city of Belogorsk is located on the river.


Tom’

 

a river in the Khakass Autonomous Oblast and in Kemerovo and Tomsk oblasts, RSFSR; a right tributary of the Ob’. The Tom’ is 827 km long and drains an area of 62,000 sq km. It rises on the western slopes of the Abakan Range. In its upper course the Tom’ is a mountain river; farther downstream it flows through the Kuznetsk Basin and the Western Siberian Lowland. The floodplain is up to 3 km wide, and the riverbed has many bars. The Tom’ is fed by mixed sources, mainly snow. The mean flow rate 580 km from the mouth is 650 cu m per sec, reaching a maximum of 3,960 cu m per sec. The mean flow rate at the mouth is 1,110 cu m per sec. The river freezes from October to early December, and the ice breaks up from late April to early May. The largest tributaries are the Mras-Su, the Kondoma, and the Un’ga on the left and the Usa, the Verkhniaia Ters’, the Sredniaia Ters’, the Nizhniaia Ters’, and the Taidon on the right. The river is used to float timber. The Tom’ is navigable as far as Tomsk and, during high water, as far as Novokuznetsk. The cities of Novokuznetsk, Kemerovo, and Tomsk are situated on the river. The Kuznetsk Coal Basin is located in the Tom’ River basin.

shore

A piece of timber to support a wall, usually set in a diagonal or oblique position, to hold the wall in place temporarily.

tom

a. the male of various animals, esp the cat
b. (as modifier): a tom turkey
References in classic literature ?
In less than five minutes' time, Tom was ensconced in the room opposite the bar--the very room where he had imagined the fire blazing--before a substantial, matter-of-fact, roaring fire, composed of something short of a bushel of coals, and wood enough to make half a dozen decent gooseberry bushes, piled half-way up the chimney, and roaring and crackling with a sound that of itself would have warmed the heart of any reasonable man.
Tom was fond of hot punch--I may venture to say he was VERY fond of hot punch--and after he had seen the vixenish mare well fed and well littered down, and had eaten every bit of the nice little hot dinner which the widow tossed up for him with her own hands, he just ordered a tumbler of it by way of experiment.
Yes, but I forgot--and I couldn't help it, indeed, Tom.
You're a naughty girl," said Tom, severely, "and I'm sorry I bought you the fish-line.
Harthouse,' said Tom, 'and therefore, you needn't be surprised that Loo married old Bounderby.
Not that it was altogether so important to her as it was to me,' continued Tom coolly, 'because my liberty and comfort, and perhaps my getting on, depended on it; and she had no other lover, and staying at home was like staying in jail - especially when I was gone.
When the boys was fifteen and upward, Tom was "showing off" in the river one day, when he was taken with a cramp, and shouted for help.
Tom had managed to endure everything else, but to have to remain publicly and permanently under such an obligation as this to a nigger, and to this nigger of all niggers--this was too much.
The first time Tom went to their cottage with his mother, Job was not indoors; but he entered soon after, and stood with both hands in his pockets, staring at Tom.
Maud established herself with great satisfaction, and Tom owned that a silk apron was nicer than a fuzzy cushion.
From one activity to another had Tom Swift gone, now constructing some important invention for himself, as among others, when he made the photo-telephone, or developed a great searchlight which he presented to the Government for use in detecting smugglers on the border.
Becky hesitating, Tom took silence for consent, and passed his arm about her waist and whispered the tale ever so softly, with his mouth close to her ear.