traceroute

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traceroute

(networking)
A TCP/IP utility, originally Unix, which allows the user to determine the route packets are taking to a particular host. Traceroute works by increasing the "time to live" value of packets and seeing how far they get, until they reach the given destination; thus, a lengthening trail of hosts passed through is built up.
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Traceroute

An Internet utility that describes the path in real time from the client machine to the remote host being contacted. It reports the IP addresses of all the routers in between. Windows comes with its own Traceroute utility (TRACERT.EXE) that is executed from the command line.


A Visual Trace
You see the nodes pop into place with NeoTrace, originally created by NeoWorx. This shows the 13 nodes from The Computer Language Company to HP's website in California. Starting at the Comcation ISP in Doylestown, PA, the route is traced to the Digex ISP (206 and digex nodes) through various routers in the BBN backbone that HP is connected to. Details are displayed when the cursor is moved over a node's icon. For more information, visit www.mcafee.com, which bought NeoWorx and incorporated NeoTrace into its Personal Firewall service.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As Figure 7 shows, the more the network delay, the higher the response time for ping and tracert. An important issue derived from our experimentation is that the probability of having a peak is higher for high network delays.
Ping can be used to test connectivity from both the client and the server, while traceroute (tracert on Windows and tracepath on some Linux versions) can help determine the available routes and paths to the destination.
and Mac systems, or the tracert command on a Microsoft Windows system.
(You can get a quick idea of latency using the tracert utility from a command prompt.)