twig

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twig

1. any small branch or shoot of a tree or other woody plant
2. something resembling this, esp a minute branch of a blood vessel

TWIG

Tree-Walking Instruction Generator.

A code generator language. ML-Twig is an SML/NJ variant.

["Twig Language Manual", S.W.K. Tijang, CS TR 120, Bell Labs, 1986].
References in classic literature ?
"I have hit an ash twig at forty yards," said Little John.
Slowly the lion rose, and as he rose, a twig snapped beneath one of his great, padded paws.
In place of his former somewhat elephantine method of progression he adopted a species of shuffle which had excellent results, for it enabled him to brush twigs away instead of stepping flatfootedly on them.
So, instead of casting about among the trees for fallen twigs, I began leaping up and dragging down branches.
against it we placed in a sloping direction a number of the half decayed boughs that were strewn about, and covering the whole with twigs and leaves, awaited the morning's light beneath such shelter as it afforded.
The frame was of poles and willow twigs, on which were stretched five elk and buffalo hides, sewed together with sinews, and the seams payed with unctuous mud.
He broke off twigs and small branches and flung them down upon our enemies.
He broke a twig from a bush, dipped it into a pool of blood and wrote rapidly.
For when the dead-leaf butterfly is in danger, it clings to the side of a twig, and what it says to its foe is practically this: "I am not a butterfly, I am a dead leaf, and can be of no use to thee." This is a lie which is good to the butterfly, for it preserves it.
Now, I saw the damp lying on the bare hedges and spare grass, like a coarser sort of spiders' webs; hanging itself from twig to twig and blade to blade.
He looked at the forest on the bank of the stream, saw the individual trees, the leaves and the veining of each leaf -- he saw the very insects upon them: the locusts, the brilliant bodied flies, the gray spiders stretching their webs from twig to twig.
'Now, child,' said he to his own daughter, 'what will you have?' 'The first twig, dear father, that brushes against your hat when you turn your face to come homewards,' said she.