Taconian orogeny

Taconian orogeny

[tə′kō·nē·ən ȯ′räj·ə·nē]
(geology)
A process of formation of mountains in the latter part of the Ordovician period, particularly in the northern Appalachians. Also known as Taconic orogeny.
References in periodicals archive ?
Geochemistry and provenance of the Middle Ordovician Austin Glen Member (Normanskill formation) and the Taconian orogeny in New England.
In the eastern part of the study area, the Appalachian range corresponds to complex, imbricated metamorphic thrust sheets produced during the Taconian Orogeny: slates with a bedded shaly matrix containing chaotic blocks of cherts, sandstone, and dolomitic schists.
These sedimentary linkages demonstrate that, like the Miramichi and Bronson Hill-Boundary Mountains, the Munsungun and Weeksboro-Lunksoos Lake pre-Silurian tracts were emergent after the Taconian orogeny. Interestingly, proximal facies are found on only one flank of these belts, a situation also similar to that of the Miramichi terrane, suggesting similar histories of local thrusting at one of their margins.
Waldron, J.W.E, and van Staal, C.R., 2001, Taconian orogeny and the accretion of the Dashwoods block: A peri-Laurentian microcontinent in the Iapetus Ocean: Geology, v.
All of these lithostratigraphic assemblages were shifted, slightly folded and metamorphosed 450 million years ago during the Taconian Orogeny, the first phase of the creation of the Quebec Appalachians.
Middle Ordovician sandstone and mudrock of the Mictaw Group were first deformed by the Middle Ordovician Taconian Orogeny, which for most authors includes the Late Cambrian to Early Ordovician Gaspesian deformation as an early phase (Rodgers 1967; St-Julien and Hubert 1975; de Broucker 1987).