taino


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Related to taino: Arawak

taino

[′tī·nō]
(meteorology)
A tropical cyclone (hurricane) in parts of the Greater Antilles.
References in periodicals archive ?
(5) The smallpox epidemic reduced the Taino population to "less than 3,000" and by 1519 further exacerbated the need for bozales, enslaved African people directly from the African continent, since the "trade in ladinos could not meet the demand" for laborers for the emerging sugar plantation economy (Pons 37; Diouf 36; Guitar 2006, 42).
Researchers took genetic information from the 1,000-year-old tooth of a Taino woman found in a cave in the Bahamas and compared it to modern Puerto Ricans, finding a stronger connection between the two than the Puerto Ricans have to any other Native American group, according to a study in the journal (http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/02/13/1716839115) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Guacanagari rescues Columbus when the Santa Maria sinks, but Caonabo questions Guacanagari's generosity, and Guarionex is vexed, having witnessed a religious prophecy of Taino genocide inflicted by a "clothed people." Columbus teaches his captive Christianity, initiating the following centuries' collision of Christianity with Native American religions and spirits.
This charge had been bestowed on them by the Taino Native Indians of Jamaica when they shared cultures and a fellowship of brotherhood/sisterhood during the days of resistance, reinforced when Taino cultural activist Vanessa Inurit of the Taino Tribe now based in Puerto Rico, visited Jamaica and toured numerous geographical regions throughout the island such as caves, burial spots, excavated spots, and the National Archives that exhibit artifacts of their once presence.
En el trabajo de Ulrich von Schmidel tambien aparecen los prestamos de palabras del taino, pero resalta la incorporacion de lexemas guaranies como yacare, mandioca, pororo, pepira y nandu.
It begins with a description of the indigenous Taino bohio and within its several pages includes such iconic buildings as the Basilica Catedral Nuestra Senora de la Altagracia.
Llorens argues that the national identity it envisioned was the hegemonic idea of racial harmony achieved through the mixing of three foundational races: Taino, Spanish, and African--a paradigm that evades the topics of race, racism, and slavery.
Chapters 2 and 3 show how, in Columbus's first two voyages, clusters of toponyms exhibiting patterns of hierarchy, symmetry, and progression create an impression of order and control, while in his third and fourth voyages, this sense of spiritual and imperial order disappears as clusters are overtaken and disrupted by a proliferation of toponyms originating in Taino and other Caribbean languages.
When Columbus arrived in the Caribbean, Puerto Rico and neighboring islands were populated by indigenous groups now commonly known as Taino, a misnomer and invention applied to the inhabitants by scholars and academics.
The traveler indicated that the five carved clay items were Arawak or Taino artifacts that were given to him as gift in the Dominican Republic.
This 100,000-year-old cave was only discovered in 1926, although it was a sacred place for the Taino Indians 1000 years ago.