acquisition

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Related to Takeovers: Hostile takeovers

acquisition

[‚ak·wə′zish·ən]
(engineering)
The process of pointing an antenna or a telescope so that it is properly oriented to allow gathering of tracking or telemetry data from a satellite or space probe.

acquisition

i. The act of visually identifying an object of interest—another aircraft, aerial target, or object/target on ground—from the air.
ii. The detection and identification of a target by radar or another sensor on board the aircraft.
iii. Reaching the desired flight parameter, such as flight level or air speed.
iv. Reaching the desired point in airspace, such as the ILS (instrument landing system) localizer or glide-slope.
References in periodicals archive ?
He regularly advises Australian and overseas clients on contested and negotiated takeovers as well as corporate and securities law matters.
Making such a distinction is vital if we are to throw some sands in the wheels of the takeover machine and allow firms some scope for long-term investment and planning.
7 billion takeover of Cadbury caused a huge furore, in particular for its treatment of employees and its decision to shut the firm's Somerdale factory near Bristol after initially suggesting it would be retained.
Parent Shanta Driver of Detroit is among those critical of mayoral takeover, maintaining that it lowered the quality of education, created financial problems and diminished accountability in her Michigan district.
The Spanish government's attempts to prevent a takeover of the Spanish electricity company Endesa by its German competitor Eon;
Various levels of technology can help prevent identity theft and account takeover.
This effort should be part of a studied, long-term plan, not of a "quick fix," which an ARS takeover represents.
Fees incurred by a target corporation in a friendly takeover must generally be capitalized, because such takeovers usually produce significant long-term benefits.
Pennsylvanians were mad as hell at Reaganomics and the takeover boom of the 1980s, and they weren't going to take it anymore.
34 (1992), at first glance, appeared to involve an unfriendly takeover that would allow clarification on the applicability of INDOPCO.
Maintaining its earlier analysis and conclusion was inconsistent with National Starch, the IRS expanded the scope of National Starch to include expenses to resist hostile takeovers.