Taliesin

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Taliesin

or

Taliessin

(both: tălēĕs`ĭn), 6th cent.?, Welsh bard, whose Book of Taliesin is one of the great Welsh poetic works. The book exists only in a 13th-century form, but tradition places Taliesin in the 6th cent., as a contemporary of the battles his poems celebrate. One theory about Taliesin is that he was an ancient Celtic mythical character, about whose name have collected a series of traditional poems.
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Taliesin

6th century ad, Welsh bard; supposed author of 12 heroic poems in the Book of Taliesin
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Taliessin Through Logres, The Region of the Summer Stars by Charles Williams, and Arthurian Torso by Charles Williams and C.S.
His most systematic exposition had been given to me in a long letter which (with that usual folly which forbids us to remember that our friends can die) I did not preserve; but fortunately I copied large extracts from it into the margin of my copy of Taliessin at the relevant passages.
And I think the effort worthwhile because Lewis considered Williams one of the two or three greatest poets of the twentieth century, and his Taliessin cycle to be one of the greatest works of literature of the century.
"Coinherent Rhetoric in Taliessin through Logres." In The Rhetoric of Vision: Essays on Charles Williams.
The entry on Taliessin, for example, concerns itself almost entirely with whether or not the Bard actually existed and has not a single word about Charles Williams's use of the character--an omission that will loom particularly large for students of the Inklings (223-4).
Though Williams has been called "among modern English poets, the foremost reshaper and recreator of Arthurian mythology," and one whose work "has not yet found the appreciation it deserves" (Goller and Thompson, 515, 517), it must be recalled that in his works he confers much of the traditional role of Merlin on Taliessin (sic).
Williams published two books of Arthurian poems, Taliessin through Logres (1938) and Region of the Summer Stars (1944).
The poet Taliessin, in "The Calling of Arthur," meets Merlin and Brisen, the children of Nimue, who are "Time and space, duration and extension" (Williams, Taliessin 129).
Ward discusses the Wood of Broceliande based on Lewis's discussion of it in Arthurian Torso, arising from Williams's "The Calling of Taliessin" (not "The Figure of Arthur").
I plan to look at Taliessin Through Logres and Region of the Summer Stars as read through some of Burke's primary critical methods.
Byzantium, the capital and center of the Empire, is the place of order; Broceliande, the "unpathed" (Taliessin 24 ["Bors to Elayne: The Fish of Broceliande"]) western forest, the place of potentiality, energy, and creativity.
Williams observes the same principle when writing about the figure of Merlin in his poem Taliessin Through Logres: "the rod of a magician is not a toy.