Tama


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Tama

 

(self-designation, Tamok), a people living on both sides of the border of the Democratic Republic of the Sudan and the Republic of Chad, northeast and southeast of the city of Abéché. Together with the related Merarit (self-designation, Abir), Sungor, and Kibet tribes, they number more than 200,000 (1970, estimate). The Tama language is related to the languages of the Central and Eastern Sudanic groups; some Tama speak Arabic. The Tama are Muslims. Their main occupations are farming (millet, wheat, and rice) and livestock raising.

References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, according to Haaretz, those who oppose the decision to end Tama 38 say that besides the fact that the end of the program will leave so many buildings without reinforcement, it would also wreak havoc on the housing market, according to the Haaretz report.
[double dagger]Hanu a, ti ta ra mibas ge |gui khoe-i tsin tita gere !hasarahe tsi khoesisa khoahes [double dagger]namipe di-e di tama amagasa.
The Renkoji site was abandoned 4 years after establishment and the colony relocated to a new site in Tama Zoological Park close to Renkoji along the Tama-gawa River.
Evans establishes Tama's villainous credentials in a horrifying torture sequence.
Tama says that his research calls "into question the conventional wisdom that crisis commissions rarely lead to policy change" (p.
De las 18 especies reportadas para el genero Gastrotheca en Colombia (ACOSTA-GALVIS, 2000) y de las seis especies reportadas para Venezuela (BARRIO-AMOROS, 2004), la rana marsupial de El Tama Gastrotheca helenae (DUNN, 1944) (Figura 1) es una de las menos conocidas.
The monk named the cat Tama, and even though their food was meager, their life together was happy.
The seminar was attended by a number of IT Savvies from government bodies and other entities who showed interest in the Taya IT products namely tama (Taya Arabic Morphological Analyzer) and Exalead Enterprise for search engine technology.
He asked this question of every visitor to this short-lived leprosy hospital and finally in 1956, Yoshinobu Hayashi, the director of Tama Zenshoen Hospital in Tokyo, brought this information to him.