Tammany Hall


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Tammany Hall

Manhattan Democratic political circle notorious for spoils system approach. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 492]
References in periodicals archive ?
He spearheaded the fight against Carmine De Sapio, the leader of Tammany Hall, and kept at it until the reformers were successful.
And somewhere in the land there will be a rising political movement which fixates on SNP dominance as an example of Tammany Hall at its worst and vows that if only Scots would vote differently, everything would be better.
Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics.
Such men were not his heroes, in fact he had a marked distaste for those logrolling Tammany Hall politicians at a local level whom he forever associated with the Labour Party and also unreasonably blanketed with the Welsh W Rugby Union despite its non-political nature.
Corruption, in Lessig's mind, is best described by his coined term "Tweedism." In the mid-19th century, William Magear "Boss" Tweed ran New York's Tammany Hall political organization, which in turn ran the city's government--at great profit to Tammany's members.
It was in the same area where office buildings and the former Tammany Hall club are currently located.
Terry Golway's Machine Made argues that the Democratic Tammany Hall machine, which dominated the city during the 19th century and early decades of the 20th, "prepared the way for modern liberalism" by creating a "model for a more aggressive role for government." In City of Ambition, Mason B.
New YorkAEs Tammany Hall has long been thought of as a black spot in the history of urban politics, a political machine filled with shady characters like William oBosso Tweed and a cast of others involved in graft, crime, and corruption.
An organization designed to be the antithesis of old-school Tammany Hall machine politics has devolved into a patronage mill for Christie's cronies.
His early political career also began in New York, not the West, as he served as a New York State Assembly representative for his uptown district, fought Tammany Hall, and honed his progressive agenda.
Savvy Black political pressure on New York's Tammany Hall machine eventually brought the reorganization of Harlem Hospital and the hiring of five Black physicians in 1925 and twenty-five more in 1930.
Shakib amasses a small fortune while documenting the farrago of Khalid's pursuits: After souring on commercialism (he burns his stash of gewgaws), Khalid becomes, in quick succession, charmed by the occult, swept up with atheists and literati, immersed in law and politics, ensnared in the politics of Tammany Hall, and tossed in jail for refusing a bribe.