Tangible User Interface


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Tangible User Interface

(interface)
An attempt to give physical form to digital information, making bits directly manipulable and perceptible by people. Tangible Interfaces will make bits accessible through augmented physical surfaces (e.g. walls, desktops, ceilings, windows), graspable objects (e.g. building blocks, models, instruments) and ambient media (e.g. light, sound, airflow, water-flow, kinetic sculpture) within physical environments.

MIT Tangible Media Group.
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, within Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), its use remains underexplored, in particular in Tangible User Interface (TUI).
Pan, "3D story cube: An interactive tangible user interface for storytelling with 3D graphics and audio," Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, vol.
The two commonly debated 'ideal' interfaces are the conventional Graphical User Interface (GUI) and Tangible User Interface (TUI).
Tangible user interface (TUI) can be defined as an interface where everyday physical objects play a central role as both physical representations and controls for digital information [18, 19].
Different from virtual user interfaces, tangible user interfaces might bring two possible potentials: psychological support and multisensory learning.
Complimentarily there exist conceptual frameworks such as for tangible user interfaces, a paradigm of providing physical form to digital information, thus making bits directly manipulable [46].
Depending on the task it is possible to use other sensor capabilities, for instance, temperature measurements with gyroscope or free-fall, activity and inactivity detection with accelerometer, altogether designing tangible user interfaces.
(2000): "Emerging Frameworks for Tangible user interfaces", IBM Systems Journal 39(3&4): 915-931.
In the realm of interaction design, tangible interaction and tangible user interfaces (TUI) are used to improve end-user interface with technology.
Audio d-touch, which is based on Dr Costanza's research into tangible user interfaces, or TUIs, gives physical control in the immaterial world of computers.