Tankette


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tankette

 

a tracked, armored combat vehicle designed for reconnaissance and communications. The first tankette model—a one-seated machine that traveled up to 8 km/hr and carried a machine gun—was developed in the British Army concurrently with the appearance of tanks, but was built only in 1924.

In the early 1930’s the T-27 tankette was adopted in the USSR. It was a two-seated vehicle armed with a machine gun; it weighed 2.7 tons and traveled up to 40 km/hr. Tankettes were used in operations to eliminate the Basmachi rebels.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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* Carden Loyd Tankette British pre-Second World War two-man tank, used mostly as a machine-gun carrier.
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As early as 1931 the Russians were training parachute infantry and had established an air-landing detachment comprising about 200 men, two tankettes, and two 76mm guns to be transported in Tupolev TB-1 bombers.
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Although such transformation may seem wise during relatively peaceful times interrupted by small, limited wars, the author suggests that we may find ourselves in the same boat as the British at the outset of World War II when their small "tankettes" could not stand up to German armor.