Tannenberg


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Tannenberg

(tä`nənbĕrk'), Pol. Stębark, village, Warmińsko-Mazurskie prov., NE Poland, near Olsztyn. Formerly in East Prussia, it was transferred (1945) by the Potsdam Conference to Polish administration. Two important battles were fought there. In the first, fought in 1410 between Tannenberg and the nearby village of Grünwald, Polish and Lithuanian forces under Ladislaus II (Ladislaus Jagiello) halted the eastward expansion of the Teutonic Knights. The second and better-known battle occurred during World War I (Aug. 27–30, 1914). Russian armies under generals Samsonov and Rennenkampf had invaded East Prussia from the south and east, respectively. German strategy was to surround Samsonov's forces; 90,000 Russian prisoners were taken, and Samsonov committed suicide. Rennenkampf, whose unwillingness to aid Samsonov greatly facilitated the German victory, was defeated soon afterward in the battle of the Masurian Lakes. The Russian advance into East Prussia, though ill-fated, relieved considerably the German pressure against the West during the first critical weeks of the war. The battle of Tannenberg is a central event in Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's novel August 1914 (1972).

Tannenberg

 

(now Stebark), a settlement in Poland, in Olsztyn Województwo (until 1945, part of East Prussia). In German literature, the battle of Grunwald of 1410 and a battle that was part of the East Prussian Operation of 1914, in which two corps of the Second Russian Army were encircled, are referred to as battles of Tannenberg.

Tannenberg

a village in N Poland, formerly in East Prussia: site of a decisive defeat of the Teutonic Knights by the Poles in 1410 and of a decisive German victory over the Russians in 1914
References in periodicals archive ?
Aside from Tannenberg and to a much lesser extent the Second Battle of the Masurian Lakes, attempts at encirclement failed.
He ends with 1410 because the Battle of Tannenberg in that year marks the end of the Jochid Ulus (which he calls "the Golden Horde") as the dominant power in Eastern Europe.
Tannenberg 1410; disaster for the teutonic knights.
Although separated by thousands of miles and fought on land and sea, the battles of Tannenberg and Falkland Islands signalled that electronic warfare had made its debut on the battlefield.
Translated from the German by Imogen von Tannenberg.
And that reflects its history, because in 1410, at the battle of Tannenberg, aka Grunwald, the Lithuanians (together with their blood brothers the Poles, whose existence they're strangely reluctant ever to recognise) fought off the Teutonic Knights while the other two cities let them in and so became members of the Hanseatic League, the great global confederation of its day, which stretched all the way from Tallinn to London.
27) After Jagiello's Lithuanian followers converted to Catholicism, the Jagiello Dynasty was able to conquer the Teutonic Order in 1410 at the battle of Grunwald and Tannenberg.
In August 1914, Solzhenitsyn shows us, through the character of Vorotyntsev, that there was nothing inevitable about the great Russian disaster at the Battle of Tannenberg.
The haughty Deutschordensritter, who ruled their Baltic and Slavic subjects within the huge conquered territories from imposing fortresses known as Ordensburgen, were finally defeated at Tannenberg by King Ladislas of Poland in 1410.
The direct outcome of such Russian incompetence is the catastrophic defeat at Tannenberg.
Similarly, in "Voinovo," set in East Prussia in the early twentieth century, a Russian iconographer of the Old Believer religious sect marries outside his faith a young Polish woman just prior to his being drafted into the German army, in which he fights at the battle of Tannenberg in 1914.