Tarnów


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Tarnów

(tär` no͞of), city (1993 est. pop. 122,200), Małopolskie prov., SE Poland. It is a railway junction and a center for the manufacture of chemicals, textiles, machinery, and processed food. Settled by the 12th cent., Tarnów was chartered in 1330. It passed to Austria in 1772 and reverted to Poland after World War I. Its most notable landmark is the Gothic cathedral (built c.1393), which contains tombs that are regarded as among Poland's finest Renaissance treasures.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tarnów

 

a city in southern Poland, situated on the Dunajec River. Administrative center of Tarnów Województwo. Population, 94,600 (1974). Tarnów is an industrial center employing 34,000 workers. It has a large chemical combine specializing in the production of nitrogenous fertilizers, polymers, and chlorine. Electrical machinery, machine tools, glass, clothing, and food stuffs are also produced in the city. Prominent works of architecture include the town hall, a cathedral, and a church, which date from the 14th through 16th centuries.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.