Tarpeia


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Tarpeia

(tärpē`yə), in Roman legend, a Roman woman who betrayed her city to the Sabines for what they wore on their left arms (their gold bracelets). As they entered Rome they crushed her under a mound of shields, which they also wore on their left arms. The Tarpeian rock at Rome, from which criminals were thrown to death, bears her name.
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There dominate the rocks famous for treason and the name of Tarpeia, rising above the heights of Rome: the Sabines occupy them; their battle order develops at the foot of the ramparts.
La dominent, s'elevent les hauteurs de Rome, les roches celebres par la trahison et le nom de Tarpeia: les Sabins les occupent; leur ordre de bataille se developpe au pied des remparts." Chaussard, 7.
Seria por isso bem interessante encontrar nesta formulacao alternativas ou propostas para o dominio da lenda em que imperam figuras como Tarpeia, Mucio Cevola, Horacio Cocles, Clelia ou Lucrecia, por exemplo, visto que tem um simbolismo marcante e fortissimo na formulacao da consciencia e da identidade do homem romano.
Thetis and Octavia fail miserably at communicating with their children; Tarpeia speaks with total lack of authority and appeals to the worst of role models, invoking Medea as her ideal.
In 4.4, Tarpeia, who betrayed Rome for love (elsewhere it is for money), (39) addresses Titus Tatius, the leader of the Sabines who were attacking Rome and the object of her affection, saying:
(Modified translation of Janan 2001, 82) Tarpeia claims that it is Tatius who is worthy of the royal robe worn by early kings of Rome and not the founding father, Romulus, who was nourished by the hard teat (dura papilla) of a barbarous she-wolf (inhumanae lupae), "without the dignity of a mother" (sine matris honore).
The negative image of the mother at lines 53-4 of the Tarpeia elegy (4.4) is further underscored by the subtle reference to the infamous child-killing mother Medea just above in line 51: o utinam magicae nossem cantamina Musae!
The speaker, Tarpeia, if a Vestal Virgin, (47) does not speak from any authority on the subject since a Vestal Virgin had and would have no experience of motherhood herself.
(46) We should also note that Tarpeia is compromised by her materialistic values and is an unreliable narrator.