Tartaric Acids

Tartaric Acids

 

dihydroxysuccinic acids, dibasic organic acids, HOOCCH(OH)—CH(OH)COOH, with two asymmetric carbon atoms in the molecule. All the theoretically possible tartaric acids are known: D-tartaric acid (I), solutions of which rotate the plane of polarized light to the right; its optical antipode, L-tartaric acid (II); D,L-tartaric acid (a

racemic mixture of D- and L-tartaric acids); and mesotartaric acid (III), which is optically inactive because of intramolecular compensation of the rotation of the plane of polarization owing to the presence of an additional axis of symmetry (ab).

The most important tartaric acid is D-tartaric acid (ordinary tartaric acid), which is present either in the free state or in the form of salts in many fruits, particularly grapes. When grape juice is fermented, the poorly soluble acidic potassium salt of tartaric acid, so-called cream of tartar, is precipitated. D-tartaric acid is obtained by the action of inorganic acids on cream of tartar.

D-tartaric acid and its salts (tartrates) are used extensively in the food industry (for example, in the preparation of soft drinks and in baking), in medicine (tartar emetic), in dyeing, in organic synthesis, and in analytical chemistry. In an alkaline medium, D-tartaric acid dissolves Cu(OH)2, yielding a transparent bright blue solution—Fehling solution—that is used as a reagent in testing the reducing capacity of substances.

V. N. FROSIN

References in periodicals archive ?
IFP's Non-PHO encapsulated ingredients include, but are not limited to, encapsulated minerals and acidulants such as salt, citric, fumaric, malic and tartaric acids, encapsulated nutraceuticals such as caffeine, and ascorbic acid and encapsulated sodium bicarbonate.
plantarum by centrifuging and resuspending cultures in either weak organic acid buffers, such as citric, lactic or tartaric acids, or in strong mineral acid solutions, such as hydrochloric or sulfuric acid solutions.
The gourd, which fittingly is called 'monkey bread' or sometimes 'cream of tartar fruit' (and yes, the citric and tartaric acids found in baobab pulp do form the basis of the baking ingredient of the same name), is high in vitamin C.
plantarum was studied by centrifuging and resuspending cultures in either weak organic acid buffers, such as citric, lactic or tartaric acids, or in strong mineral acid solutions, such as hydrochloric or sulfuric acid solutions.
The following objectives were therefore chosen for the current investigation: to study the kinetics of potassium (K) and silicon (Si) release from partially humus-free clay and clay-humus complex by tartaric acid; to study structural changes in humus-free clay and clay--organic complex by X-ray diffraction after extraction by tartaric acids
When gneiss of various particle sizes was exposed to malic and tartaric acids (Wang et al.
AHAs comprise a group of organic carboxylic acids, including glycolic, lactic, citric, malic, mandelic and tartaric acids.
Organic chemicals which include glycolic, lactic, citric, pyruvic, malic and tartaric acids.
typhimurium in the chicken breast by infusing combinations of organic acids, specifically acetic, citric, malic and tartaric acids, into the meat.
The occurrence of malic and tartaric acids under WW and not under LL is consistent with the understanding that these LMWOA are exuded by the roots of cereal plants as a control mechanism against the effects of high soil solution Al (Delhaize et al.
There were additional acids present, including quinic, malic and small amounts of succinic and tartaric acids.