Tatpurusha

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Tatpurusha

 

in ancient Indian grammar and later in comparative historical grammar as well, a class of compound words; also, a word belonging to this class. Tatpurushas are also referred to as determinative, attributive, appositive, and subordinating compounds. In these compounds the meaning of the last constituent is modified by the first constituent; consequently, the interrelationship of the constituents is similar to case-governed relationships.

In some languages, for example, in Sanskrit, the first constituent of a tatpurusha may be both a word stem and a case form. Examples are Sanskrit svarga-gati (“the way to heaven”) and vane-cara (“the one living in the forest”), Russian krovoprolitie (“bloodshed”; from prolitie krovi, “shedding of blood”) and vodoprovod (“water conduit”; from to, chto provodit vodu, “that which conducts water”), German Königshaus (“king’s house”), and English doorknob.

References in periodicals archive ?
References to five faces of Siva are contained in the "Visnudharmottarapurana", which, accordingly, are Sadyojata, Vamadeva, Aghora, Tatpurusa and Isana.
power or energy; Tatpurusa, air, and Isana, which lies on the top, represents the sky.
It is precisely the issue of the status of what is termed karman as the condition for the occurrence of krt-affixes and nominal terminations that is the crux of a problem in the derivation of the upapada tatpurusa compound kumbhak[a.
bar] provides that a word (pada) terminating in a sixth-triplet nominal termination is optionally compounded with another word ending in a nominal termination and that the resulting compound is termed tatpurusa.
bar]ra is prevented because the tatpurusa compound of the upapada kumbha with the speech form kara is brought about by A.
That is, avyay[bar{i}]bh[bar{a}]va, tatpurusa, bahuvr[bar{i}]hi, and dvandva compounds are described by some in terms of semantics, such that they are respectively compounds whose principal meaning is that of the prior term, the last term, neither term, and both terms.
16 The compound khaggavisana / khadgavisana is sometimes interpreted, beginning with the Pali commentary, not as 'rhinoceros', but as a tatpurusa meaning 'rhinoceros-horn'.
The improbable construction of yatna-dharma into a tatpurusa (in addition to a dvandva) compound in a double attempt to link the two primary themes of the study strikes one as a bit of idle legerdemain, out of tune with what constitutes, on the whole, an impressive study.
1) that both ancient and modern interpreters of the CU take this compound to be a tatpurusa.
Within the context of the entire passage, it makes much better sense, I believe, to take dharmaskandhah as a possessive or exocentric compound (bahuvrihi) rather than a tatpurusa.
We have already seen the problem that previous commentators and scholars have run into in interpreting sarva ete - "all these"; this expression refers to persons, while, according to the tatpurusa analysis the previous sentences deal with divisions of dharma.
The author translates with "en tete du bhava," interpreting the word as a tatpurusa compound (genitive relation) with inverted order of the constituents.