Taurus dark cloud

Taurus dark cloud

[′tȯr·əs ′därk ′klau̇d]
(astronomy)
A large, relative nearby aggregate of dust and gas in which star formation is taking place.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
I had first learned of and planned to view the Taurus Dark Cloud complex a few months prior but didn't have a map good enough to find its nebulae.
The easiest one was B19-B22, the 6[degrees]-long Taurus Dark Cloud. I could follow all of it, although the northwestern finger was just detectable.
South of the Taurus Dark Cloud my 8-inch at 30x showed all of 1.7[degrees]-long B18, looking a little larger than charted, as well as barely discernible B208, by far the thinnest of any of my successes.
Observing the Taurus Dark Cloud and the other two large winding dust clouds isn't exceptionally difficult, but I haven't read of any other reported observations except for Nova Scotian Paul Gray's detection of the thin neck in B211 near Phi Tauri.
We'll focus here on Lupus 1, a molecular cloud 450-500 light-years from Earth and a member of our local galactic neighborhood (it's found in what's known as Loop I, next to our Local Bubble and just opposite the famous Taurus Dark Cloud).