Taurus-Littrow

Taurus-Littrow

(lit -roff) A highland region on the Moon on the eastern borders of Mare Serenitatis. It was the target for Apollo 17.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
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Consul General Darian Arky told that Eugene Cernan (who once exclaimed: "Went to explore the Moon and in fact discovered the Earth!") and the crew of Apollo 17, the final manned mission to the Moon, visited Pakistan in 1973: "Arriving in the modern-day successor to the ancient civilization of the Indus River Valley, they brought with them a piece of Moon rock from Taurus-Littrow Valley.
"This fragment is a portion of a rock from the Valley of Taurus-Littrow. It is given as a symbol of the unity of human endeavor and carries with it the hope of the American people for a world at peace," says the plaque describing the object.
The final words spoken on the moon, by mission commander Gene Cernan, were: "As we leave the moon at Taurus-Littrow, we leave as we came and, God willing, as we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind.
The panoramas include the Valley of Taurus-Littrow, massif walls, and even a peek at Earth from the lunar surface.
Astronauts Eugene Ceman and Harrison Schmitt had to zig-zag their lunar rover up and over the cliff face of the Lee-Lincoln fault scarp during the Apollo 17 mission that landed in the Taurus-Littrow valley in 1972.
Astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt had to zig-zag their lunar rover up and over the cliff face of the Lee-Lincoln fault scarp during the Apollo 17 mission that landed in the Taurus-Littrow valley in 1972.
The tour takes the viewer from fascinating geological features, such as the 2,500-km (1,600-mile)-wide South Pole-Aitken Basin, to the historic landing site of the Apollo 17 mission in the Taurus-Littrow Valley.
The rovers will "study NASA's Apollo 17 lunar roving vehicle that was used by the last astronauts to walk on the Moon (Commander Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt) to explore the Taurus-Littrow valley in December 1972," and will transfer the scientific data and high-definition video back to Earth, via the base station.
They also observed special features of the valley of Taurus-Littrow -- a valley created by the impact of a comet or mountain-sized asteroid on the surface of the moon.
MISSION LANDING NAME SITE (1) Apollo 11 Sea of Tranquility (2) Apollo 12 Ocean of Storms (3) Apollo 14 Fra Mauro Formation (4) Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennine (5) Apollo 16 Plain of Descartes (6) Apollo 17 Taurus-Littrow Lunar "Lost & Found"
Most other pyroclastic deposits are smaller, but two others are easy to find because of their darkness--the Taurus-Littrow landing site of Apollo 17, and Rimae Sulpicius Gallus, across the southern margin of Mare Serenitatis.