Taximeter


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Taximeter

 

an instrument that records the distance a taxi has traveled and automatically indicates a fare based on established rates. A taximeter is a mechanical counter with a revolving, cable-driven drum. The counter is connected to the driven shaft of the taxi’s transmission by means of a gear reducer. If the vehicle stops while the taximeter is running, the counter is driven by a clock mechanism that continues calculating the fare. In addition to the fare, the taximeter registers the total distance in kilometers covered by the taxi, the distance in kilometers over which fares have been collected, the number of trips made with passengers, and the total of the fares collected for the workday.

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With their taximeter, their apps that they use, their technology, those are taximeters basically, which by law only we are allowed to use," said Fitz.
The regulator says its provisional view is thatsmart phoneapplications do not constitute a taximeter but has asked theHigh Courtfor a view.
The egg is no sooner laid than it falls gently through a slot, which marks its passage on a kind of taximeter; and if the total of eggs at the end of the month is below the average, the Company pays--I had almost said, the Company lays--an exact monetary equivalent for the shortage.
A NEW "tamper-proof" global positioning system (GPS) taximeter for Cardiff's private hire cars has been approved by councillors.
The abbreviations which have become words in their own right are ampere, brassiere, omnibus, discotheque, permanent wave, perquisite, perambulator, Promenade Concert, recapitulation and taximeter cab.
And that's with five years to go on the cash taximeter. Then there's the VAT issue.
In the same manner, the findings of script analyses can point out the distinguishing features of resources that are typically used, such as tools (for example, graffiti instruments, skeleton keys, and ladders), sophisticated devices (for example, software for breaking into computer systems, eavesdropping equipment, counterfeiting machinery, and taximeter accelerating devices), dangerous weapons or materials (for example, knives, guns, explosives, and toxic substances), crucial information (for example, the layout of a building and the timetable of security patrols), and gear needed to access restricted areas (for example, a special uniform, a personal identification card, and a confidential code).
This seems to be the case in Sweden (funding based entirely on number of students and number of study credits achieved by students) and the United States (performance-based funding and a high share of private funding by students) (CHEPS, 2001), while in Denmark the share of tertiary graduates in the 25-34 age group has increased markedly since the introduction of the taximeter model (funding entirely based on passed exams by students) in 1992; from 19% in 1991 to 31% in 2002.
In 1978 local authorities was given responsibility for deciding on the number of taxi licenses to be issued in taximeter areas.
The word taxi derived from the taximeter, invented by Wilhelm Bruhn in 1891 to measure the distance travelled.
According to Denmark's "taximeter" system for funding educational programs, education and training providers, including lifelong learning providers, receive per capita grants from the state for each full-time equivalent enrollment.
The incentives for institutions in the tertiary sector, and more recently the vocational upper-secondary sector, to adapt to students' demands for educational programmes have improved with the introduction of the "taximeter" financing system, whereby resources are matched to student achievement at each institution.