Taylor series

(redirected from Taylor Series Expansion)

Taylor series

[′tā·lər ‚sir·ēz]
(mathematics)
The Taylor series corresponding to a function ƒ(x) at a point x0 is the infinite series whose n th term is (1/ n !)·ƒ(n)(x0)(x-x0) n , where ƒ(n)(x) denotes the n th derivative of ƒ(x).
(naval architecture)
Resistance charts based upon model tests of a series of ships derived by altering the proportions of a single parent form; used to study the effects of these alterations on resistance to the ship's motion, and to predict the powering requirements for new ships.
References in periodicals archive ?
q,N] is the value at which the Taylor series expansion is defined.
new] is expressed using a 1st order Taylor series expansion around H*,
These predictor-corrector methods can be obtained using a number of methodologies; among which is the use Taylor series expansion of [y.
n] is the Taylor series expansion of f at z = 0 then the corresponding formal power series [f] = [[summation].
The well known Taylor series expansion at an operation point was used where the first two terms were taken into account.
The finite difference equations are obteined from the Taylor series expansion of f, as will see below, is give by
The fourth section presents the model in the form of a Taylor series expansion, and the fifth section extends the theory to excess reserves, free reserves, total reserves, and nonborrowed reserves.
Applying a second-order Taylor series expansion around [Mathematical Expression Omitted] and [Mathematical Expression Omitted] yields.
i], and it seems reasonable to examine the Taylor series expansion of the sum of the two generating functions.
n] required for Equation 3 can be found through a Taylor series expansion of this equation.
Rushdi[7] and Rushdi and Kafrawy[15] have demonstrated that under the assumption of the statistical independence of basic events, the top event probability is a multiaffine function of basic event probabilities and hence can be obtained through an exact and finite Taylor series expansion.
The same Taylor series expansion discussed above leads to the approximation,