Te Deum laudamus


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Te Deum laudamus

(tē dē`əm lôdā`məs, tā dā`o͝om loudä`mo͝os) [Lat.,=we praise Thee, O God], early chant of the Western Church beginning, "We praise Thee, O God, we acknowledge Thee to be the Lord." Legend ascribes it to an ecstatic outburst of St. Ambrose when he baptized St. Augustine. It is now widely attributed to Bishop Nicetas of Dacia (c.335–414). It is sung at morning prayer in Anglican churches and at matins in the Roman office.
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An inscription placed below the prophets, reading TE PROPHETARUM LAUDABILIS NUMERUS ("praiseworthy number of prophets"), taken from the first lines of the fourth-century Ambrosian hymn Te Deum laudamus, a regular component of the Mass, unequivocally communicated that the imagery was to be understood in connection with the Roman liturgy.
As in Benozzo Gozzoli's beautiful (and fanciful) rendition of Ambrose baptizing Augustine, the text, traditionally from Ambrose himself, says it all: Te deum laudamus.
2000 Te Deum Laudamus, Salice Salentino: Italy is the home of so many great-value red wines.