tea tree

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tea tree

any of various myrtaceous trees of the genus Leptospermum, of Australia and New Zealand, that yield an oil used as an antiseptic
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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tea tree

tea tree

A disinfectant 30 times more powerful than carbolic acid. Dissolves pus and inhibits bacterial growth. Used externally as anti-fungal and antiseptic for parasites, skin diseases, wounds, acne, ringworm, athlete’s foot. Few drops in water for gargling, mouth and gum cleansing, vaginal cleansing of candida etc. Not recommended taken internally. Long thin leaves, white flowers in spikes, cup-shaped fruit.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2000, a trial program of management of the reserve was implemented using slash and burn in small areas of vegetation, with the aims: to assess the invasion of Coast Tea-tree, to determine the effect of each treatment on species richness and to observe the response of individual species of weeds and orchids where appropriate.
Dry Tea-tree was burnt in 2002, slashed in mid 2007, burnt in 2010; B.
Quadrats (1 x 1 m) in the centre and in each corner of the 20 x 20 m quadrats were examined, recording all species present and all Coast Tea-tree seedlings.
There is almost no recruitment of Coast Tea-tree under mature closed-canopy tea-tree heath.
The only quadrat with mature Coast Tea-tree is the control (D) where the lowest number of understorey species was found (Table 2).
In the control quadrat, the mature Coast Tea-tree reached 4 m in height, bare ground was 20% and litter 70%.
The primary value of the trial is that detailed observations were made so that we have a measure of the effect of the treatments on the invasion of Coast Tea-tree, on species richness, on weeds and on two orchid species, one of which is a known fire response species and one which is rare.
Mature Coast Tea-tree does not burn easily because there is so little fuel underneath the canopy; slashing prepares a fuel load that will burn readily.
After germination it takes only four years before Coast Tea-tree plants flower and set seed (M Ellis pers.