teahouse

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Related to Teahouses: tea shops

teahouse

a restaurant, esp in Japan or China, where tea and light refreshments are served

Teahouse

A Japanese garden house used for the tea ceremony.

teahouse

A Japanese garden house used for the tea ceremony.
References in periodicals archive ?
Again, Frembgen sprinkles his narrative with details that hooked me throughout, such as the Turkish practice of placing sugar under one's tongue while sipping bitter tea, the cultural mores of Afghan teahouses where refusing tea is considered a great insult to the host, and that turning your glass upside down was a message to the host that you did not want any more.
The author is conscious of spatial dimensions as he describes famous teahouses as public and political spaces.
Unlike the other teahouses, Macko is open from 8:00 PM till 1:00 in the morning.
After 2 1/2 years of tolerating the water pipes in teahouses, the government moved last year to ban them.
Just less than two years old, this teahouse (drink-in or take-out) was started by a father and daughter who spent time in Japan and while there acquired a love of good tea and conversation.
Guo's success means several teahouses in Beijing are now doing live crosstalk shows, and his troupe has grown from a handful of performers to nearly 100.
Stephen Grinsell and Sharon Olver (CORR SPELL) want to launch a specialist teahouse selling a range of international teas, and the idea has got them into the final of Biz Idol 2005.
Modelled on the Czech teahouses which have been springing up all over Prague in the last 10 years, Tchai Uvna sells over 80 different kinds of leaf tea.
I saw some of the teahouses while I was in Beijing and saw how popular they were with the expatriate community.
But in designing his true masterpiece, for society portraitist Frank Miles at no 44, he composed a facade of interlocking rectangles of balconies and windows that recall the asymmetrical geometry of traditional Japanese teahouses.
Hawaii had about a dozen teahouses before World War II.
Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province, was called "China's Paris" by Marco Polo and remains famous for its silks, teahouses and spicy cuisine.