dot-com bubble

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dot-com bubble

The late 1990s during which countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never made a penny. Billions in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was a crazy time, and people were very excited. With all of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and countless concepts and techniques were developed that continue today. Compared to other industries, one must keep in mind that the Internet is still in its infancy! See dot-com and New Economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
In what should be a surprise to no one, the Turnbull Government has racked up another tech wreck, with the failure of online NAPLAN testing.
com bubble came, then the tech wreck of 2000, then the financialization of housing and home mortgages --up, up, up until 2009.
Perhaps more noteworthy is that this outperformance was accomplished during the tech wreck and Great Recession.
In 2004, the Internet bubble was still a recent memory and Google's offering was seen as the first significant tech IPO in the aftermath of the 2000-2002 tech wreck.
Real estate returns started rising after the tech wreck, which led investors to increase their allocations in 2005.
Doesn't anybody remember the tech wreck of 2000-01?
With Omni and Genesis merged, OMGEN's other co-founder, Chester Hutchinson, says they started looking at investments at the height of the dot-com frenzyleading up to the tech wreck of 2000.
Markets significantly affected by the tech wreck, including Boston and San Francisco, continued to see a drop in momentum.
Meanwhile, the multifamily and office markets, plagued by the loss of jobs from the tech wreck, have seen lowered occupancy rates, forcing concessions from owners.
Almost two years after the tech wreck began, the digerati appear to be feeling better about the future of newspaper Web sites
First, the hedge fund industry has undergone significant changes, starting in 2001 when it was able to avoid the tech wreck, and again in 2008, when on average hedge funds lost less than half as much as equities.