dot-com bubble

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dot-com bubble

Throughout the late 1990s, countless Internet companies were riding an enormous wave of enthusiasm that pushed their stock valuations into the stratosphere even though they never earned a penny. In the dot-com bubble, billions of dollars in venture capital were given to entrepreneurs with little or no experience to fund ideas that were ludicrous. It was an emotional time, and people were very excited. In spite of the nonsense, many dot-coms did survive, and concepts and techniques were developed that continue today in other companies and other forms. See dot-com company, dot-com bust and New Economy.
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References in periodicals archive ?
credit ETFs are probing lows again as the tech wreck continues on Wall Street, raising concerns about the ability of borrowers to pay back their loans.
E-Trade noted that despite two bouts of "tech wreck" in June and July, the IT sector has performed well this year.
Perhaps more noteworthy is that this outperformance was accomplished during the tech wreck and Great Recession.
In 2004, the Internet bubble was still a recent memory and Google's offering was seen as the first significant tech IPO in the aftermath of the 2000-2002 tech wreck.
Unfortunately the 'Tech Wreck' of the early 2000s saw the dotcom stock market collapse and work dried up for TMT lawyers - "the bubble" as Chris states, "had well and truly burst".
"Real estate returns started rising after the tech wreck, which led investors to increase their allocations in 2005.
(Doesn't anybody remember the tech wreck of 2000-01?) Biotech/life sciences (65%) and automotive (62%) rounded out the top three.
With Omni and Genesis merged, OMGEN's other co-founder, Chester Hutchinson, says they started looking at investments at the height of the dot-com frenzyleading up to the tech wreck of 2000.
This case focuses on the efforts of an Internet startup firm to survive in light of the "tech wreck" of April 2000.
The herd instinct was a prime factor in the 2000 to 2001 "tech wreck," the 1929 stock market crash and the Mexican currency crises of 1982 and 1984.
Markets significantly affected by the tech wreck, including Boston and San Francisco, continued to see a drop in momentum.