technorealism


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technorealism

Dealing with technology in a realistic manner. It seeks to attain a balance between the two extremes of either believing technology will make the world a utopia or thinking that it will destroy everything.
References in periodicals archive ?
Technorealism is a name that has been coined for thinking critically about the role that information technology plays in society and history.
This technoromantic (Benyon & Mackay, 1989) or technicist (Bryson & deCastell, 1998) perspective has recently been met with a call to assume a middle ground of so-called technorealism where the rhetoric and reality of technology is brought into focus (Walker & White, 2002).
Technorealism is a name that has been coined for thinking critically and realistically about the role information technology plays in history and society.
This is not the technorealism Johnson was once known for espousing as a middle road between technophiles and technophobes.
At least, that's the claim made by those giving this perspective a name: technorealism.
Technorealism is a more nuanced way to think about the changes occurring due to the rise of the microchip, the digital bit and interactive networks.
This document seeks to articulate some of the shared beliefs behind that consensus, which we have come to call technorealism.
Technorealism demands that we think critically about the role that tools and interfaces play in human evolution and everyday life.
Technorealism is desperately needed in teacher education programs to help ameliorate the mad rush to computer technology integration for its own sake.
Technorealism offers a more balanced and "rational" approach to the latest technologies and the resulting changes in thoughts as well as actions.
The technorealism approach in teacher education suggests the integration of technology that can facilitate "powerful" approaches to teaching and learning including meaningful, creative, challenging, inquiry-based, and active applications.
We advocate this as the foremost principle of technorealism regarding computer technology integration in teacher education programs.