teak

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Related to Tectona: Tectona grandis

teak,

tall deciduous tree (Tectona grandis) of the family Verbenaceae (verbenaverbena,
common name for some members of the Verbenaceae, a family of herbs, shrubs, and trees (often climbing forms) of warmer regions of the world. Well-known wild and cultivated members of the family include species of the shrubby Lantana and of Verbena;
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 family), native to India and Malaysia but now widely cultivated in other tropical areas. Unfortunately, the wood of plantation teak is considered inferior to that of wild teak; consequently the wild populations are being decimated. Teakwood is moderately hard, easily worked, and extremely durable; beams said to be over 1,000 years old are still functional. The wood contains an essential oil that resists the action of water and prevents the rusting of iron. The heartwood is resistant to termites. Teak is superior to all other woods for shipbuilding and is also used for furniture, flooring, and general construction. Several other similar woods from unrelated trees are sometimes also called teak. Teak (Tectona grandis) is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Famiales, family Verbenaceae.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

teak

A dark golden yellow or brown wood with a greenish or black cast, moderately hard, coarse-grained, very durable; immune to the attack of insects; used for construction, plywood, and decorative paneling. See also: Masonite
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Teak

 

(Tectona grandis), a tree of the family Verbenaceae. Teak grows to 40–50 m in height and has large leaves 30–60 cm in length. The small flowers grow in panicles. The fruits are drupelike. Teak grows in deciduous forests of Asia, from India to Indonesia. It is cultivated in tropical regions of Asia for its valuable wood, which is used in the construction of ships, trains, and buildings and in furniture-making.

Teakwood is beautiful and has a narrow white alburnum and a yellowish heartwood that browns as it dries. The wood is very tough and resistant to decay, harmful insects, and chemicals, yet it is easily worked. Oldfieldia africana, a tree of the family Euphorbiaceae that grows in West Africa and yields valuable wood, is called African teak.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

teak

A dark golden yellow or brown wood with a greenish or black cast, found in southeastern Asia, India, and Burma; moderately hard, coarse-grained, very durable; oil which it contains gives it a greasy feeling and makes it immune to the attack of insects; used for exterior construction, plywood, and decorative paneling; also called Indian oak.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

teak


teak

1. a large verbenaceous tree, Tectona grandis, of the East Indies, having white flowers and yielding a valuable dense wood
2. any of various similar trees or their wood
3. the hard resinous yellowish-brown wood of this tree, used for furniture making, etc.
4. a brown or yellowish-brown colour
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 8 species of trees were found, namely, Tectona grandis, Swietenia mahagoni, Acacia auriculiformis, and other trees such as Samanea saman, Gnetum gnemon, Alstonia scholaris, Parkia speciosa, and Tamarindus indica.
Site Index Curves For Teak (Tectona grandis L.) in The Limestone Hill Region of Puerto Rico.
Lindgren, "Impact of fertility variation on gene diversity and drift in two clonal seed orchards of teak (Tectona grandisLinn.