tectonic plate


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tectonic plate

[tek′tän·ik ′plāt]
(geology)
Any one of the internally rigid crustal blocks of the lithosphere which move horizontally across the earth's surface relative to one another. Also known as crustal plate.
References in periodicals archive ?
For about 50 million years, the Indian tectonic plate has been slipping under the Eurasian Plate at a rate of about 15 to 20 millimeters each year.
Giant earthquakes will more likely occur in subduction zones where one tectonic plate goes under another.
In this region, Arabian tectonic plate has been pushing against the Eurasian plate at a rate of approximately 3 centimetres per year," he said.
But my hunch is that capitalism's tectonic plates can only shift when the reformers and the protesters start to talk with one another.
The Northeast Pacific Time-Series Undersea Networked Experiments (NEPTUNE) Program is an ambitious plan to wire an entire tectonic plate off the Pacific Northwest with sensors delivering real-time data from above and below the sea floor.
Tectonic plates will shift again, here and elsewhere, on our flawed planet, without discriminating between nationalities.
Italy's recent earthquake brought to light the need for more research into predicting tectonic plate movement, the primary cause of earthquakes.
The disappearance of a tectonic plate into Earth's interior maybe responsible for the distinctive bend in the chain of underwater mountains and islands that includes the Hawaiian archipelago.
Subduction zones are locations where one tectonic plate is forced under another one.
He also pointed out that Oman was part of the Arabian tectonic plate.
During the five-week expedition they will use explorer robots to map individual volcanoes on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge tectonic plate boundary.
During the five-week expedition, they will use the explorer robots to map individual volcanoes on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge tectonic plate boundary - which effectively runs down the centre of the Atlantic Ocean - almost two miles below the surface of the sea.