Tegea


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Tegea

(tē`jēə), ancient city of Greece, SE Arcadia, in the Peloponnesus. From the middle of the 6th cent. B.C. until the Spartan defeat at the battle of Leuctra (371 B.C.), it was dominated by Sparta. In 362 B.C. Tegea allied with its rival, Mantinea, against Sparta, but later it again opposed Mantinea. At Tegea there are remains of the temple of Athena Alea, which was rebuilt (c.370–355 B.C.). Scopas was the architect and sculptor.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
References in classic literature ?
Everything irrational should, if possible, be excluded; or, at all events, it should lie outside the action of the play (as, in the Oedipus, the hero's ignorance as to the manner of Laius' death); not within the drama,--as in the Electra, the messenger's account of the Pythian games; or, as in the Mysians, the man who has come from Tegea to Mysia and is still speechless.
He drove them through the country of the Pelasgi, and Achaea in the land of Phthia, and through Locris, and Boeotia and Megaris, and thence into Peloponnesus by way of Corinth and Larissa, until he brought them to Tegea. From there he went on by the Lycaean mountains, and past Maenalus and what are called the watch-posts of Battus.
And those that held Arcadia, under the high mountain of Cyllene, near the tomb of Aepytus, where the people fight hand to hand; the men of Pheneus also, and Orchomenus rich in flocks; of Rhipae, Stratie, and bleak Enispe; of Tegea and fair Mantinea; of Stymphelus and Parrhasia; of these King Agapenor son of Ancaeus was commander, and they had sixty ships.
KARACHI -- Two ships Tegea and NCC Noor carrying 39,922 tonnes Coal and 29,916 tonnes Palm oil were arranged berthing at Multi Purpose Terminal and Liquid Cargo Terminal respectively on Sunday.
2015 Ktima Tselepos, Kokkinomylos, Merlot, PGI Tegea, Greece, Abv 14.6%
Among these were Jason, leader of the Argonauts; Theseus king of Athens; and swift-footed Atalanta, "the warrior girl of Tegea," a creature of the forest, suckled by a she-bear after being abandoned by her father, who had wished for a son.
Phidippides declared, Herodotus tells us, that in the Parthenian hills above Tegea, he met Pan, who told him to ask the Athenians why they did not take thought for him, even though he had been serviceable to the Athenians, and would be so in the future as well.