Tiresias

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Tiresias

(tīrē`shəs, –sēəs), in Greek mythology, a blind soothsayer who appears in many legends. According to one myth, when he saw Athena bathing she blinded him, but by way of compensation granted him prophetic powers. Another story is that Hera blinded him for disparaging her sex when he claimed that women enjoyed love more than men; Zeus then recompensed him with long life and the power of prophecy.

Tiresias

prophet who lived as man and a woman. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 255–256]

Tiresias

made sightless by Athena for viewing her nakedness. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 1086]

Tiresias

blind and greatest of all mythological prophets. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 255; Gk. Lit.: Antigone; Odyssey; Oedipus Tyrannus]

Tiresias

saw two snakes copulating and was changed into a woman. [Gk. Myth.: Jobes, 1576]
References in periodicals archive ?
The subject of the public contract is the construction of air-conditioning in 4 classrooms of the Teiresias Center in the Rectorate of Masaryk University at Komenskho nm.
He behaves arrogantly, firmly believing that his knowledge is vastly superior to that of Teiresias the prophet and that of Creon, his brother-in-law and (unrecognized) uncle, both of whom he accuses of plotting against him.
Oedipus subjects a series of unwilling citizens to questioning, including blind prophet Teiresias. Teiresias, informs Oedipus that Oedipus himself killed Laius.
In Sophocles it is more pronounced in case of Creon and Teiresias. The nature of the argument between Antigone and Creon in Sophocles is sexist.
Teiresias the seer it was, 'old man With wrinkled dugs', etc., who thrice swore That fate would drive Odysseus from the shore Of Ithaca again, despite his plan To quit Penelope's embrace no more Throughout the remnant of his mortal span.
3.452-53); Manto, the daughter of Teiresias (4.463-65); Thiodamas the son of Melampus 8.278-79); Maeon, the son of Haemon (2.692-93).
Pieces of Polyneices' body are vomited up by birds over the city's altars, but this is the cause of Teiresias' terrified augury of doom for Creon, rather than grim comedy.
He had been told by Teiresias's spirit to purify himself from the blood of the suitors to pacify sea-god Poseidon.
Although the basic tension in ironic tragedy is usually between the knowing spectator and the limited vision or blindness of the hapless protagonist, occasionally there is a medial structure, where a player gains some insight (exclusive of a privileged seer such as Teiresias or Cassandra).
'The optimistic rationalist in Euripides: Theseus, Jocasta, Teiresias.' In M.
As the seer Teiresias tells him: "It is this very luck that has destroyed you".
Thebes's "rascal prophet" (705), Teiresias, has just accused him of being the king's murderer, and Oedipus is explaining to Jocasta that he suspects her brother, Creon, of colluding with the blind seer.