phreaking

(redirected from Telephone hacking)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Telephone hacking: Computer hacking

phreaking

(jargon)
/freek'ing/ "phone phreak" 1. The art and science of cracking the telephone network so as, for example, to make free long-distance calls.

2. By extension, security-cracking in any other context (especially, but not exclusively, on communications networks).

At one time phreaking was a semi-respectable activity among hackers; there was a gentleman's agreement that phreaking as an intellectual game and a form of exploration was OK, but serious theft of services was taboo. There was significant crossover between the hacker community and the hard-core phone phreaks who ran semi-underground networks of their own through such media as the legendary "TAP Newsletter".

This ethos began to break down in the mid-1980s as wider dissemination of the techniques put them in the hands of less responsible phreaks. Around the same time, changes in the phone network made old-style technical ingenuity less effective as a way of hacking it, so phreaking came to depend more on overtly criminal acts such as stealing phone-card numbers.

The crimes and punishments of gangs like the "414 group" turned that game very ugly. A few old-time hackers still phreak casually just to keep their hand in, but most these days have hardly even heard of "blue boxes" or any of the other paraphernalia of the great phreaks of yore.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Greens leader Bob Brown has called for a full inquiry into media practices and ownership as the scandal over telephone hacking and payments to police officers by News Corp s British newspapers reached fever pitch.
The telephone hacking episode raises a number of issues that the industry should address.
News Corp chairman Rupert Murdoch flew into London on Sunday to tackle a high-profile telephone hacking scandal that forced him to abruptly shut British tabloid News of the World following allegations of illegal reporting tactics by some of its reporters.
The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) Friday welcomed the announcement of inquiries into the illegal phone tapping and media ethics following revelations of widespread telephone hacking by journalists at the British tabloid newspaper, The News of the World, owned by Rupert Murdoch.
The row broke out after the Guardian reported that News Group Newspapers - part of Rupert Murdoch's News International empire which publishes the News of the World - has paid out more than Au1 million to settle cases that threatened to reveal evidence of its journalists' involvement in telephone hacking.
He spoke out after The Guardian claimed News Group Newspapers, which publishes titles including the News of the World, had paid out more than pounds 1m to settle cases that threatened to reveal evidence of its journalists' alleged involvement in telephone hacking.
"The first being that News Limited is guilty of the same kind of misbehaviour uncovered by the UK telephone hacking scandal.
Which is just as well as the consequences of the cuts imposed by the Government may be under more scrutiny than ever, now public attention is turning from the telephone hacking scandal.
Though the telephone hacking saga has been bubbling for some time it is only this week -- when it emerged investigators may have accessed voicemail messages of crime victims -- that the affair captured much wider public attention.
The furore broke after the Guardian claimed that News Group Newspapers, which publishes the News of the World, had paid out more than pounds 1 million to settle cases that threatened to reveal evidence of its journalists' alleged involvement in telephone hacking.
Four statecontrolled websites were the victim of cyber-attacks and telephone hacking incidents.
Two months after Andrew Coulson was forced by the mounting outcry over the telephone hacking scandal to resign as director of communications at Downing Street, he was a dinner guest of Mr Cameron at Chequers, the Prime Minister's historic weekend residence.

Full browser ?