Tell el Amarna

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Tell el Amarna

Tell el Amarna or Tel el Amarna (both: tĕl ĕl ämärˈnä), ancient locality, Egypt, near the Nile and c.60 mi (100 km) N of Asyut. Ikhnaton's capital, Akhetaton, was in Tell el Amarna. About 400 tablets with inscriptions in Akkadian cuneiform were found there in 1887. They constitute correspondence between Amenhotep III and Ikhnaton and the governors of the cities in Palestine and Syria, and they shed much light on ancient Egypt and the Middle East. The tablets are mostly in the Berlin, British, and Cairo museums.
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Tell el Amarna

a group of ruins and rock tombs in Upper Egypt, on the Nile below Asyut: site of the capital of Amenhotep IV, built about 1375 bc; excavated from 1891 onwards
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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The texts are from a group of tablets discovered by local natives at the end of the 1880s near the modern village of Tell al-Amarna in Middle Egypt, but with no clear explanation for how they got there.