Tell el Amarna


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Related to Tell el Amarna: Akhetaten

Tell el Amarna

or

Tel el Amarna

(both: tĕl ĕl ämär`nä), ancient locality, Egypt, near the Nile and c.60 mi (100 km) N of Asyut. Ikhnaton's capital, Akhetaton, was in Tell el Amarna. About 400 tablets with inscriptions in Akkadian cuneiform were found there in 1887. They constitute correspondence between Amenhotep III and Ikhnaton and the governors of the cities in Palestine and Syria, and they shed much light on ancient Egypt and the Middle East. The tablets are mostly in the Berlin, British, and Cairo museums.
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Tell el Amarna

a group of ruins and rock tombs in Upper Egypt, on the Nile below Asyut: site of the capital of Amenhotep IV, built about 1375 bc; excavated from 1891 onwards
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References in periodicals archive ?
This well-researched book makes evocative reference to the sights and smells of Ancient Egypt, even describing the lavatorial arrangements discovered at Tell el Amarna. There are also mentions of political whitewashing.
The setting for her recollections, the site of Tell el Amarna, holds endless fascination to all those interested in the field of Egyptology.
Tell el Amarna, 200 miles north of the Theban heartland, was the site chosen for the new capital, Akhetaten, `The horizon of the Aten'.