Telluric Line

telluric line

[tə′lu̇r·ik ′līn]
(spectroscopy)
Any of the spectral bands and lines in the spectrum of the sun and stars produced by the absorption of their light in the atmosphere of the earth.

Telluric Line

 

any of the spectral lines formed in the spectrum of celestial bodies as a result of the absorption of light by the molecules of gases in the earth’s atmosphere, such as oxygen, ozone, water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Telluric lines or bands in individual regions of the spectrum, such as the infrared and ultraviolet regions, make the earth’s atmosphere almost opaque to the corresponding radiation. Telluric lines in the spectra of celestial bodies are detected either on the basis of their intensification as a body approaches the horizon or on the basis of the absence of the Doppler shift, usually observed in solar or stellar lines. Telluric lines were first detected by D. Brewster in 1832 during observations of the solar spectrum.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Picsaint (Purely Inductive Controlled Source Audio Magnetotellurics) electromagnetic method introduced by Val d'Or Sagax has the power and sensitivity of CSAMT without the unwanted static effects created by the telluric line.
A month or two preceding opposition the earth was approaching the planet rather rapidly, at least rapidly enough for the water vapor absorption lines of the Martian atmosphere to be displaced (according to the Doppler-Fizeau principle) to the violet of the telluric lines.
We discussed finding charts, refraction, guiding problems, telluric lines, bias-, flatfield- and dark-correction images, shock fronts, excitation levels, ftp servers, USB extenders, FITS formats, and, and .