Telome


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Telome

 

the terminal portion of the dichotomously branched body of the earliest higher plants, that is, plants not divided into leaves and stems; in a broader sense, the entire body of such plants. There are spore-bearing telomes and vegetative telomes. A. L. Takhtadzhian and K. I. Meier consider all telomes to be primarily spore-bearing. The telome is the parent form of the principal organs of higher plants.

References in periodicals archive ?
The higher land plants evolved from the telome trusses of the primitive forms along three parallel lines, as indicated in the following table:
Reduction of a telome system may lead to the formation of a single needle-like leaf (Fig.
The sporophyll, according to the telome theory, is composed of one or more telomes or both telomes and mesomes.
On this basis a few selected fields will be explored to see whether morphological facts have been clarified or may be interpreted usefully in the light of the telome theory.
The telome theory offers one explanation for the nature of the aerial portion of the plant body of the Ophioglossaceae.
The anatomy of some species of the Medutlosaceae supports certain aspects of the telome theory.
The telome theory is also involved in the interpretation of the nature of the plant body in the coenopterid ferns.
It is suggested that this structure is not a synangium but is comparable to a single fertile telome divided by numerous septa.
The most extensive and fruitful application of the telome concept is found in the studies of Dr.
Each organ was a cruciately dichotomized terminal telome system carrying two or more pendent ovules at the apex (Fig.
The ovule represents a single fertile telome which had attained its terminal position after a process of overtopping.
One of the most clearly defined phylogenetic relationships involving the telome concept was worked out by Florin (1949) between the Lower Permian Trichopitys heteromorpha and the living Ginkgo biloba.