Temper Rolling

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Temper Rolling

 

(also called skin pass rolling, or dressing), in engineering, a finishing operation in the production of thin strips of steel and nonferrous metals. It consists of cold rolling with very low reduction of area (not more than 3 percent). As a rule, the metal is subjected to temper rolling after heat treatment. Temper rolling increases the yield point to 30-50 meganewtons per sq m (3-5 kilograms-force per sq mm), reducing the possibility of formation of flow lines, which mar the surface of products, on the metal during cold stamping.

Temper rolling is necessary for sheet metal that is to undergo cold forging with deep drawing, such as sheet steel intended for making motor-vehicle body parts (so-called auto steel) and sheet iron. Depending on the purpose of the sheet metal, its surface is worked to various degrees during temper rolling, and it is partially aligned in the process. Temper rolling is done in skin-pass mills, usually in one stroke, and less frequently in several strokes.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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