temporal bone

(redirected from temporal bones)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to temporal bones: Parietal bones, occipital bones, lacrimal bones

temporal bone

either of two compound bones forming part of the sides and base of the skull: they surround the organs of hearing
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

temporal bone

[′tem·prəl ‚bōn]
(anatomy)
The bone forming a portion of the lateral aspect of the skull and part of the base of the cranium in vertebrates.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tabular Column Number of temporal bones dissected 34 Tympanic membrane found intact 30 Number of temporal bones in which all the 28 ossicles found intact Number of temporal bones in which all 31 structures of middle ear cavity visualised Number of temporal bones in which Type A 24 sinus tympani found Number of temporal bones in which Type B 8 sinus tympani found Number of temporal bones in which Type C 2 sinus tympani found Damaged Causes of non-visualisation of structures during dissection
Most primary lymphomas of the head and neck are of the NHL variety and are generally extranodal in location at initial presentation occurring most commonly in the nasopharynx, lacrimal sac, and the temporal bone [10].
She still had a slight tendency to favour the right although it was now hard to distinguish the flattening of the occiput and temporal bones that was initially present.
The mastoid segment of the facial nerve runs posteromedially along the external auditory canal to its exit from the temporal bone at the stylomastoid foramen (13 mm in adults) [12].
The stl-model was modified to cover temporal bone ("ear") areas.
KEY WORDS: Internal acoustic meatus; Anthropometry; Anatomy; Temporal Bone.
For all temporal bones, measurements were first performed without an implantable transducer and then with an implanted transducer.
In another study, Di Martino et al compared the appearance of the facial nerve canal in 357 routine ear operations with 300 temporal bone specimens from 150 autopsies.
CT scan revealed an osteolytic lesion of the petrous apex of the temporal bone with loss of clear bony margins of the carotid foramen (Figure 7(a)).
Patients were selected on the basis of their symptoms and clinical findings suggestive of a lesion involving the temporal bone such as otalgia, otorrhoea and sensorineuronal deafness, pulsatile tinnitus, vertigo and giddiness.
Cholesterol granuloma involving the temporal bone. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 1976;85(2 Pt 1):204-9.
Cancer metastases to the temporal bone, including the middle ear, are relatively uncommon.

Full browser ?