Tendon Reflex


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

Tendon Reflex

 

the contraction of a muscle or group of muscles in response to stimulation of the proprioceptors of the tendon of one of these muscles. The stimulation excites the muscle spindles, which transmit the excitation through quick-conducting nerve fibers to the motoneurons that innervate the given muscle. The reflex arc of a tendon reflex ends within a single segment of the spinal cord, and any excitation of the spinal cord affects the magnitude of the reflex. Consequently, disturbances of the central nervous system are reflected in changes in some tendon reflexes. An example is the patellar reflex—the extension of the leg at the knee when the patellar tendon is tapped.

References in periodicals archive ?
SIgns and Symptoms of Cervical Myelopathy Common Neck pain Parasthesias in upper extremities Urinary dysfunction; increased urgency and frequency Hyperreflexia below the level(s) of the lesion Primitive reflex(es) present Upper/lower extremity weakness not confined to single root level Less Common Bowel dysfunction Isolated lower extremity pain Neck stiffness Unilateral or bilateral upper extremity pain Gait disturbance Diminished deep tendon reflexes at the level of the lesion Normal cranial nerve exam Lhermitte's sign Isolated parasthesias in lower extremities Spasticity (usually in later stages) REFERENCES
Because the reflex torque is induced by the tendon tapping force and varied with the tapping force, treating them as output and input of the tendon reflex system, respectively, is appropriate [10].
Data of patella tendon reflex and peak torque performance were collected as baseline measurement.
Pain of neural origin (neuropathic pain) may be associated with muscle weakness, altered tendon reflexes and fasciculations.
In my experience, a delayed Achilles tendon reflex (ATR) return is the most reliable physical sign of hypothyroidism, and other investigators have made the same observation.
Electrophysiological findings and routine biopsy findings point to CIDP; the only feature which would probably rule out CIPD was preserved deep tendon reflex. Because autoimmune diseases are often the cause of peripheral neuropathy, we determined various autoantibody levels.
However, in a follow up study (Cochrane et al., 2010a) reported that after five minutes of continuous acute indirect vibration (f = 26 Hz, A = 6 mm, SV) there was minimal change in patellar tendon reflex properties, but muscle twitch characteristics were potentiated indicating that a greater myogenic response was present compared to a neural-mediated effect of a reflex potentiation.
CMT 1A is characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy of the distal limb muscles beginning in the peroneal group, mild distal sensory loss, diminished tendon reflexes, and slow nerve conduction velocity.[1] Spinal nerve root hypertrophy is a distinct sign of CMT 1A.[2] This sign can be detected on magnetic resonance images (MRI), but it is often overlooked.
She only presented with a brisk deep tendon reflex in the lower limbs, representing a slight pyramidal sign.
The neurological examination indicated decreased bilateral lower limb muscle powers, absent bilateral patellar tendon reflex, and positive pathology reflex on the right side.
(6) No sensory disturbance and tendon reflex abnormalities
In a neurologic examination, she was paraplegic, she had urinary and fecal incontinence, and deep tendon reflexes of lower extremities (patella and achilles reflexes) were decreased.