Tennyson

(redirected from Tennysonian)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Tennyson

Alfred, Lord Tennyson. 1809--92, English poet; poet laureate (1850--92). His poems include The Lady of Shalott (1832), Morte d'Arthur (1842), the collection In Memoriam (1850), Maud (1855), and Idylls of the King (1859)
References in periodicals archive ?
The best Tennysonian elegiac pastoral is like this: it moves effortlessly from a particular situation to a general statement about the state of the world, and expands its pastoral landscape to include the implications of elegy.
We may not want grand Tennysonian inversions, but we do demand a syntax capable of the occasional complex sentence or a diction that shows even a trace of verbal ingenuity.
He then took up a theme he had fully discussed in his earlier books on English poetry, the change in English literature from Tennysonian formality to a revolutionary fresh use of current English in poetic utterance that became the poetic idiom of poetry of the twentieth century.
Malcolm (Donald Grody), the resident eccentric, a retired scientist in sarong and earring, delivers all manner of Darwinian and Tennysonian wisdom to the audience in stagey head tones.
It is true, of course, that the original reception of Four Quartets, and its persistent canonization as an essentially Tennysonian poem, have prevented it from being read as a repetition in which the past is re-configured.
Both poets sought a pentameter that would sound more natural, less orotund and Tennysonian, and in doing so they reintroduced into the line (deliberately or otherwise) a feature that had hitherto (as the following table shows) characterized only the specifically oral medium of Shakespeare's dramatic verse: catalexis, or the omission of nonbeatbearing syllables in the line:
Huxley, argued that nature was violent, competitive, in the Tennysonian phrase "red in tooth and claw," the antithesis of morality, so that morality in fact arose in opposition to the evolutionary tendencies of nature.
Despair (the Tennysonian "breaks, breaks, breaks") would be more like it.
With opening sequences involving various historical kings inter-marrying or sparring off each other, it sometimes seemed as if the production design (a touch of Mad Max meets Excalibur) occludes the legitimacy of the inherited notion - for most of us Tennysonian - of the Arthurian ideal.
And, as a production of Britain's recently exalted Poet Laureate, the Tennysonian ode mentioned by The Examiner testified in the most explicit of ways to the final transformation of the military hero into an abiding national icon: "Mourn for the man of long-enduring blood" the "Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington" incited its readers: "Mourn for the man of amplest influence,/Yet clearest of ambitious crime,/ Our greatest yet with least pretence" (25, 28-30).
The Tennysonian understanding of passion is made absurd.
The Keatsian and Tennysonian tones of Duncan's language honor the deep romanticism of his own procedural and imaginative biases.