Tension Fault

tension fault

[′ten·chən ‚fȯlt]
(geology)
A fault in which crustal tension is a factor, such as a normal fault. Also known as extensional fault.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tension Fault

 

a fracture in the earth’s crust caused by tension; the rocks that are separated simply move apart and experience no other relative displacement. The fissure formed by a tension fault either remains gaping or fills with mineral material that has risen from the depths or been precipitated from water solutions. The largest genuine tension fault is the Great Dyke of Rhodesia, which is filled with cooled magma. It reaches 10 km in width and is more than 500 km in length.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It represents a tension fault structure which is built by shallow landslides in its southern part but to N it passes to a deep seated deformation.