tension wood

tension wood

[′ten·chən ‚wu̇d]
(botany)
In some hardwood trees, wood characterized by the presence of gelatinous fibers and excessive longitudinal shrinkage; causes trees to lean.

tension wood

Abnormal wood found on the upper side of hardwood branches and leaning trunks; characterized by abnormally high longitudinal shrinking, causing warping and splitting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reaction Wood Drying Kinetics: Tension Wood In Fagus Sylvatica And Compression Wood In Picea Abies.
When cutting from the back, tension wood may break suddenly and the tree will fall before you expect it, creating a "barber chair." The safest way to drop them is to bore into the trunk, parallel to and above the hinge, leaving the tension wood intact, then cut back through the tension wood.
Asymmetric hormonal distributions can promote the formation of compression wood in conifers and tension wood in angiosperms.
They involved faces of tediously tapered Osage (compression wood) backed by desert hackberry (tension wood), reflexed on a 24-inch radius, further reflexed (but not quite static) after splicing more hack-berry into the tips, the lighter material used to reduce weight and increase speed.
Fuzzy grain may occur due to the presence of tension wood often present in branch wood.
At the same time, the velocity in normal wood was higher than it was in tension wood, and it gradually increased in normal wood as the radial distance increased from pith to bark.
The reaction wood of dicotyledonous angiosperms is called tension wood and is produced along the upper sides of leaning stems and branches, causing reorientation by contraction on the upper side pulling the stem or branch back into a normal growth position.
Tension wood is formed by woody dicotyledons to generate the force necessary for reorientation of branches and stems following gravistimulation or loss of apical dominance.
Tension wood or brittleheart and interlocked grain can cause wooliness.
Tension wood, present in hardwood tree species, is more difficult to machine than normal wood.
Problem areas, such as tension wood, burls, and knots, and their effect on stress must be specifically considered.
For example, compression wood forms on the lower side of a leaning tree trunk or branches of softwoods, while tension wood forms on the upper side of the leaning trunk and branches of hardwoods (Panshin et al.