Tensometer


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tensometer

[ten′säm·əd·ər]
(engineering)
A portable machine that is used to measure the tensile strength and other mechanical properties of materials.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tensometer

 

a type of strain gage; an instrument for measuring deformations induced by mechanical strains in solids. Tensometers are used to study the distribution of deformations in machine parts, structures, and structural components during mechanical tests of materials. Electrical resistance tensometers, in which a resistance strain gage serves as the principal element, are the most common type.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
even if it is a monitor, with that the patient is being offered contact; while placing the oximeter or tensometer, one can talk to the patient, you can explain the procedure and give instructions about their pathology; if the patient has high blood pressure you can talk to him, or if he or she is taking medications or if he or she has never had high blood pressure; well, you start to interact with them ...
Stress-strain measurements were carried out at a crosshead speed of 500 mm / min and gauge length of 50 mm on the Hounsfield Tensometer tensile strength tester with Serial No.
The maximum wound breaking strength (MWBS) was calculated from three 10 mm strips from each wound (n=18) with a tensometer (Tensometer 10; Monsanto Co., St.
The tensile tests were performed on various tensile samples using Monsanto tensometer. The fracture load for each sample was noted as well as the diameter at the point of fracture and the final gauge length.
Immediately after death, the maximum load (breaking strength) tolerated by excised femurs, expressed in Newton (N), was measured on coded samples by using a calibrated tensometer (Sans, China), as previously stated (Bitto et al.
A 2 ton capacity-Electronic tensometer, METM 2000 ER-I model supplied by M/S Mikrotech, Pune was used to find the tensile strength of the specimens.
Temperature and moisture of the soil were measured with a digital thermometer and tensometer, respectively.
Twenty threads for each species were pulled to failure using an Instron-5565 tensometer (Canton, MA) equipped with a computer interface.
"In the forming section, a properly calibrated tensometer micrometer, and a high intensity strobe light are the most cost effective tools," said Marc White, sales manager, packaging & board, U.S.
gibba were tested using a Monsanto tensometer equipped with a compression attachment.