Tephritidae

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Tephritidae

[tə′frid·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The fruit flies, a family of myodarian cyclorrhaphous dipteran insects in the subsection Acalyptratae.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tephritidae

 

a family of flies. The body is usually 3–5 mm long and bears multicolored wings. There are about 4,000 species, which are distributed in all parts of the world. The larvae are herbivorous and develop in fruits, inflorescences, or leaves. Some species damage fruit (including grapes) and vegetable crops. The Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata) damages the juicy fruits of more than 200 plant species. The cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis cerasi) eats cherries, and Myiopardalis pardalina damages muskmelons, watermelons, pumpkins, and cucumbers. The olive fruit fly (Dacus oleae) destroys olive crops.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Larval host plant influences male body size and mating success in a tephritid fruit fly. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 166: 41-52.
Mortality in three African tephritid fruit fly puparia and adults caused by the entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana.
In Hawaii, the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae, is one of four nonnative tephritid fruit fly species that cause up to $15 million annually in direct losses to the state's fruit and vegetable crops, including squash, melon, cucumber, and tomato.
Approximately 2000 berries were collected from different regions of Germany, examined for signs of piercing and then cut open to examine any infestation by the larvae of the tephritid fruit fly (Rhagoletis meigenii).
Oviposition response and development of the egg-pupal parasitoid Fopius arisanus on Bactrocera oleae, a tephritid fruit fly pest of olive in the Mediterranean basin.
This study is the first that included almost all commercially available tephritid fruit fly attractant traps.
The classical biological control of invasive tephritid fruit fly pests using hymenopteran parasitoids has been used in Hawaii.
Results from a tephritid fruit fly. Annals of the Entomological Society of America 110: 204-211.
Effect of soil temperature and moisture on survival and infectivity of Metarhizium anisopliae to four tephritid fruit fly puparia.
Sperm allocation and cost of mating in a tropical tephritid fruit fly. Journal of Insect Physiology 52: 839-845.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of both phenylacetaldehyde and 1,4-DMB for attractiveness in traps relative to fresh and aged torula yeast, a protein bait used for tephritid fruit fly monitoring.