Terastor

Terastor

(Terastor, Inc., San Jose, CA) A company that was developing a next-generation hard disk. Founded in 1995 and disbanded in 2000, advances in regular hard disks kept it from gaining the edge it was looking for. Terastor's Near Field Recording (NFR) used a patented Solid Immersion Lens (SIL) from Stanford University that focused the laser beam down to a tiny spot. It employed magneto-optic recording, but placed magnetic and optical elements on the same head rather than on opposite sides of the platter. See magneto-optic disk.
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In late 1995, TeraStor of San Jose, Calif., began developing a novel MO drive using focusing optics with a solid immersion lens--a moderately high refractive index lens placed in close proximity (<< [Lambda]) to the disk recording surface (not a near-field technique) [4].
Much is made, for example, of TeraStor's solid-immersion lenses, but only one sentence notes that, after five years, this approach still has "various technical kinks." Similarly, Toigo reports that Seagate is looking for more thermally stable (he calls them "harder") recording media.
TeraStor, in another project, is trying to fabricate "mesas and valleys" on a disk's flat surface to keep magnetic data spots physically apart, but such tiny sizes impose big manufacturing headaches.
UNISON technology was developed to promote the cross-platform compatibility of new rewritable media technologies such as DVD, magneto-optical, and TeraStor's NFR.
TeraStor Corp., San Jose, Calif., is working on a near-field technology that combines magnetic recording with laser optics.
One of the key optical components inside TeraStor's flying head is a solid immersion lens, which is used to tightly focus a laser beam to produce an ultra-small spot.
TeraStor's technology evades the superparamagnetic limit in several ways.
TeraStor will this year launch a new 10Gb removable hard disk drive, priced at US$800 and the company has outlined plans to introduce a 20Gb model next summer.
Optical technologies are taking us into the future."[7] By the end of 1998, the strategic alliance of the TeraStor Corporation (San Jose, CA) and Imation (Simi Valley, CA) hope to offer a 5.25-in.
Has anybody actually seen a TeraStor drive or a Quinta drive?
Where are Quinta and TeraStor? Shouldn't they have produced at least some entry-level product by now?
"Terastor is developing a drive that offers similar benefits to the marketplace," Potts noted.